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IRL (In Real Life) => Current Events => Topic started by: bayonetbrant on January 09, 2017, 09:08:31 AM

Title: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on January 09, 2017, 09:08:31 AM
http://phys.org/news/2017-01-milky-black-hole-spewing-planet-size.html

Quote
Every few thousand years, an unlucky star wanders too close to the black hole at the center of the Milky Way. The black hole's powerful gravity rips the star apart, sending a long streamer of gas whipping outward. That would seem to be the end of the story, but it's not. New research shows that not only can the gas gather itself into planet-size objects, but those objects then are flung throughout the galaxy in a game of cosmic "spitball."

"A single shredded star can form hundreds of these planet-mass objects. We wondered: Where do they end up? How close do they come to us? We developed a computer code to answer those questions," says lead author Eden Girma, an undergraduate student at Harvard University and a member of the Banneker/Aztlan Institute.
Girma is presenting her findings at a Wednesday poster session and Friday press conference at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society.
Girma's calculations show that the closest of these planet-mass objects might be within a few hundred light-years of Earth. It would have a weight somewhere between Neptune and several Jupiters. It would also glow from the heat of its formation, although not brightly enough to have been detected by previous surveys. Future instruments like the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and James Webb Space Telescope might spot these far-flung oddities.

more at the link
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on January 09, 2017, 12:25:26 PM
Thus proving my theory that we are all really living inside a giant, cosmic Pin-Ball Machine and Earth is worth only 25 points.  :nerd:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: OJsDad on January 09, 2017, 12:33:51 PM
So, not only do we have to worry about a small object like a meteor hitting Earth, we also have to worry about planets also?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on January 09, 2017, 05:31:12 PM
Yes, especially....... Uranus.  :-"
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: OJsDad on January 09, 2017, 05:37:46 PM
Only when I eat a lot of cashews   O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on January 09, 2017, 07:39:22 PM
This is also cool

https://medium.freecodecamp.com/the-mind-blowing-ai-announcement-from-google-that-you-probably-missed-2ffd31334805?source=reading_list---technology------39-4---------
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on January 10, 2017, 04:13:45 AM
^He redeemed himself with Update #1.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on January 10, 2017, 09:13:34 AM
"SkyNet" Begins. Better get in da chopper now.  :coolsmiley:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Emeraldlis on January 11, 2017, 01:30:36 PM
On a recent trip to Paris , I went down to reception to ask for a hairdryer and the guy brought me a heater for the room  ;D  which we actually wanted , so we kept it !!! But then we got google translate on the phone and wrote what we needed to say , and then let him read it in French  :bd: talk about the confusing of languages , it started at the Tower of Babel , but it certainly didn't end there for me ;D but that article about a new system to learn its own translation between languages , that's unreal , mind boggling  :o
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on January 11, 2017, 05:26:29 PM
Africa is splitting in two

http://www.bbc.com/news/10415877
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on January 11, 2017, 05:30:31 PM
Africa is splitting in two

http://www.bbc.com/news/10415877

Time to buy up some future beach front property!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on January 11, 2017, 06:09:54 PM
Africa is splitting in two

http://www.bbc.com/news/10415877 (http://www.bbc.com/news/10415877)

Time to buy up some future beach front property!

I like the sound of Mirthburgh.

Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on January 11, 2017, 06:15:42 PM
Wouldn't Mirthheim be better?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on January 11, 2017, 06:20:20 PM
That is much better.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on January 11, 2017, 08:53:28 PM
Great! I just bought a new globe.  #:-)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: OJsDad on January 14, 2017, 07:24:04 PM
Murrayland?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: OJsDad on January 14, 2017, 07:46:52 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/health/2017/01/14/thanks-to-ai-computers-can-now-see-your-health-problems.html

Quote
Thanks to AI, computers can now see your health problems

By Megan Molteni Published January 14, 2017

Patient Number Two was born to first-time parents, late 20s, white. The pregnancy was normal and the birth uncomplicated. But after a few months, it became clear something was wrong. The child had ear infection after ear infection and trouble breathing at night. He was small for his age, and by his fifth birthday, still hadn’t spoken. He started having seizures. Brain MRIs, molecular analyses, basic genetic testing, scores of doctors; nothing turned up answers. With no further options, in 2015 his family decided to sequence their exomes—the portion of the genome that codes for proteins—to see if he had inherited a genetic disorder from his parents. A single variant showed up: ARID1B.

The mutation suggested he had a disease called Coffin-Siris syndrome. But Patient Number Two didn’t have that disease’s typical symptoms, like sparse scalp hair and incomplete pinky fingers. So, doctors, including Karen Gripp, who met with Two’s family to discuss the exome results, hadn’t really considered it. Gripp was doubly surprised when she uploaded a photo of Two’s face to Face2Gene. The app, developed by the same programmers who taught Facebook to find your face in your friend’s photos, conducted millions of tiny calculations in rapid succession—how much slant in the eye? How narrow is that eyelid fissure? How low are the ears? Quantified, computed, and ranked to suggest the most probable syndromes associated with the facial phenotype. There’s even a heat map overlay on the photo that shows which the features are the most indicative match.

“In hindsight it was all clear to me,” says Gripp, who is chief of the Division of Medical Genetics at A.I. duPont Hospital for Children in Delaware, and had been seeing the patient for years. “But it hadn’t been clear to anyone before.” What had taken Patient Number Two’s doctors 16 years to find took Face2Gene just a few minutes.

Face2Gene takes advantage of the fact that so many genetic conditions have a tell-tale “face”—a unique constellation of features that can provide clues to a potential diagnosis. It is just one of several new technologies taking advantage of how quickly modern computers can analyze, sort, and find patterns across huge reams of data. They are built in fields of artificial intelligence known as deep learning and neural nets—among the most promising to deliver AI’s 50-year old promise to revolutionize medicine by recognizing and diagnosing disease.

Genetic syndromes aren’t the only diagnoses that could get help from machine learning. The RightEye GeoPref Autism Test can identify the early stages of autism in infants as young as 12 months—the crucial stages where early intervention can make a big difference. Unveiled January 2 at CES in Las Vegas, the technology uses infrared sensors test the child’s eye movement as they watch a split-screen video: one side fills with people and faces, the other with moving geometric shapes. Children at that age should be much more attracted to faces than abstract objects, so the amount of time they look at each screen can indicate where on the autism spectrum a child might fall.

In validation studies done by the test’s inventor, UC San Diego researcher Karen Pierce,1 the test correctly predicted autism spectrum disorder 86 percent of the time in more than 400 toddlers. That said, it’s still pretty new, and hasn’t yet been approved by the FDA as a diagnostic tool. “In terms of machine learning, it’s the simplest test we have,” says RightEye’s Chief Science Officer Melissa Hunfalvay. “But before this, it was just physician or parent observations that might lead to a diagnosis. And the problem with that is it hasn’t been quantifiable.”

A similar tool could help with early detection of America’s sixth leading cause of death: Alzheimer’s disease. Often, doctors don’t recognize physical symptoms in time to try any of the disease’s few existing interventions. But machine learning hears what doctor’s can’t: Signs of cognitive impairment in speech. This is how Toronto-based Winterlight Labs is developing a tool to pick out hints of dementia in its very early stages. Co-founder Frank Rudzicz calls these clues “jitters,” and “shimmers:” high frequency wavelets only computers, not humans, can hear.

Winterlight’s tool is way more sensitive than the pencil and paper-based tests doctor’s currently use to assess Alzheimer’s. Besides being crude, data-wise, those tests can’t be taken more than once every six months. Rudzicz’s tool can be used multiple times a week, which lets it track good days, bad days, and measure a patient’s cognitive functions over time. The product is still in beta, but is currently being piloted by medical professionals in Canada, the US, and France.

If this all feels a little scarily sci-fi to you, it’s useful to remember that doctors have been trusting computers with your diagnoses for a long time. That’s because machines are much more sensitive at both detecting and analyzing the many subtle indications that our bodies are misbehaving. For instance, without computers, Patient Number Two would never have been able to compare his exome to thousands of others, and find the genetic mutation marking him with Coffin-Siris syndrome.

But none of this makes doctors obsolete. Even Face2Gene—which, according to its inventors, can diagnose up to half of the 8,000 known genetic syndromes using facial patterns gleaned from the hundreds of thousands of images in its database—needs a doctor (like Karen Gripp) with enough experience to verify the results. In that way, machines are an extension of what medicine has always been: A science that grows more powerful with every new data point.

1UPDATE 3:00 pm Eastern 1/9/17 This story has been updated to correct Dr. Pierce’s relationship to RightEye; she is the author of the GeoPref Autism Test, which was licensed and further developed for commercialization by RightEye. An earlier version of this story incorrectly cited Dr. Pierce as RightEye’s inventor
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on January 15, 2017, 06:05:00 AM
https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/some-like-it-bot/
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on January 15, 2017, 08:34:40 AM
architecture in Antarctica

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-38574003?SThisFB
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Emeraldlis on January 15, 2017, 01:34:56 PM
architecture in Antarctica

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-38574003?SThisFB

Woah......there is some seriously cool architecture going on in Antarctica  :o I liked the design inside the Halley vi building , I think it's genius that they thought to include as much sensory stimulation that Antarctica lacks , like putting bright red and blue in the sleeping areas , and the windows in the sleeping areas to let in light .....I think you'd get cabin fever without that natural light streaming in ! Plus you need it to naturally wake up and stimulate all of those different wake/sleep hormones , so I like how they've thought about that , the welfare of the people in the buildings , not just the building itself  :) I loved the idea of them taking into consideration the sense of smell , by including a staircase made from Lebanese cedar wood , I bet that just smells wonderful to wake up to . I've also never thought of that before , what it must be like to have very little rainfall on that continent......being British , that sounds traumatic !!!!!! :D no need for a brolly.... :wow: hahahahaha  ;D

The sleek design of that first building looks very cool , wow , I'd love to visit that . It's a shame it's not open to the public , but then again , where would they stay if they went ? They'd have to build a hotel , I'm surprised that's not been done , there must be some bored billionaire businessman out there who wouldn't mind a venture like that . Hell, if Richard Branson can fund space Tourism.....any thing is possible !!!!

Even the photography in that article is stunning , the green sky over one of the buildings is stunning . It looks like the southern lights , although the article makes no mention of it being that . But I can't think of any other reason the sky would be that colour  ???

I also wonder what the study on isolation turned up ? It can't be good , I just hope their findings produce newer coping mechanisms to help anyone who's had to deal with that in their life .

I really enjoyed looking at and reading that article , that was a cool find , thanks for posting :)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: MetalDog on January 18, 2017, 07:04:08 PM
Russian space agency and NASA teaming up on possible mission to Venus:


http://www.space.com/35333-russia-nasa-venus-mission-venera-d.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on January 18, 2017, 09:21:13 PM
Looking for ISIS? It would be a great place to hide.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Emeraldlis on January 19, 2017, 08:30:15 AM
Russian space agency and NASA teaming up on possible mission to Venus:


http://www.space.com/35333-russia-nasa-venus-mission-venera-d.html

Great article MD  O0 flying through "Venusian skies " sounds like a seriously cool thing to do  8) it's a shame how long it always takes to plan these missions and execute them , although I doubt astronauts would take that same view , lol , I guess they'd want it to be as airtight as possible . It's just a pain waiting half a life time to find out if a planet has anything that could sustain any form of life ! I personally think that they will never find life in outer space , on other planets , nothing like we have on earth . Although fantasy movies about aliens and other life forms on other plants are really cool , wish that could be true in real life , lol  :)

It's great to learn a little bit more about Venus in that article , the quiz was really good , and I now know that the surface would crush the living day lights out of us , AND the air is full of sulphuric acid ....so , no good for our lungs then !!!!!! I hope Russia and nasa are still co-operating by the time that mission launches ...with the way things are going , who knows  ??? Really enjoyable read though , great find MD  :)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: MetalDog on January 19, 2017, 04:28:06 PM
Thank you O0  I love reading about space, but I'm not a big science fiction fan.  Go figure.  However, I happen to think that there's life in a lot of places in the universe.  The problems are time and distance.  That's why I believe that man will need to colonize our own solar system first before we can get anywhere else.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: MetalDog on January 20, 2017, 11:18:27 PM
Interview with Freeman Dyson (Yes, THAT Dyson):


http://www.businessinsider.com/freeman-dyson-interview-2016-9
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on January 21, 2017, 08:38:46 AM
Love his vacuum cleaners.  :clap:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Emeraldlis on January 21, 2017, 04:35:58 PM
Thank you O0  I love reading about space, but I'm not a big science fiction fan.  Go figure.  However, I happen to think that there's life in a lot of places in the universe.  The problems are time and distance.  That's why I believe that man will need to colonize our own solar system first before we can get anywhere else.

Your welcome MD :)  that's an intresting opinion you have MD , and you're  certainly not alone in believing in maybe life existing out there ....I say maybe , only because it hasn't been proven yet , not because I'm disrespecting your opinion :) I agree time and distance stop us from venturing too far outside our solar system , and therefore it's difficult to say what's out there for sure  ??? But just sticking with what we do know , our own solar system .....what I think , and it's just my own opinion , not trying to put that on you , just expressing what I see . Everything about the earth is perfect for human life , we need water , the earth is 70% water , we need oxygen to breathe and we omit carbon dioxide as we exhale , the atmosphere is a perfect mix of gases for us to breathe , and the carbon dioxide is recycled naturally by the planet ...trees .and such . We would have no seasons on earth if the world didn't have the perfect tilt and an axis , we don't just have human life , all,of this supports animal life as well .....not to mention the sheer diversity of flora and fauna :) 

I'm not telling you anything new here , but to my mind , I think .....if we can't even find single cell life forms on other planets in our solar system , the simplest form of life ......and even a cell is far from simple , and yet all those planets are close to earth , surely if life was to be found , it should be close to us ? If it was going to spread , surely it should spread from us first ?

And then there's the problem of, life on any planet would have to be compatible with the planet , just like humans are compatible with earth :)

Don't get me wrong , I would LOVE to see life on other planets because otherwise those planets are kind of a waste !!! Why are those planets there , I don't have the answer , I think they are big life questions ....but I think it's great to ponder those things :) just wanted to share my opinion , I love discussions like this , and thought your opinion was great and intresting :)  Thanks MD  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: MetalDog on January 21, 2017, 10:58:06 PM
Thanks, E.  I have no basis in my belief other than sheer numbers.  Billions of Galaxies?  There HAS to be life out there.  Whether it looks like us or not, I don't know.  Might be.  Might not.  But the Mars rover just found mud remains and where there's mud remains, there was water and...you know the rest.

I've stated this on site before, I truly believe in order to survive, man is going to have to colonize the solar system.  Whether it's on space stations orbiting planets, in habitats on moons or planets or some combination.  But it needs to happen.  The human race is going to suck the planet Earth dry if we don't find alternate ways to live in harmony with the environment.  And part of that is going to be learning to get resources off planet.  At least mineral ones to begin with.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on January 22, 2017, 04:06:10 AM
Thanks, E.  I have no basis in my belief other than sheer numbers.  Billions of Galaxies?  There HAS to be life out there.  Whether it looks like us or not, I don't know.  Might be.  Might not.  But the Mars rover just found mud remains and where there's mud remains, there was water and...you know the rest.

I've stated this on site before, I truly believe in order to survive, man is going to have to colonize the solar system.  Whether it's on space stations orbiting planets, in habitats on moons or planets or some combination.  But it needs to happen.  The human race is going to suck the planet Earth dry if we don't find alternate ways to live in harmony with the environment.  And part of that is going to be learning to get resources off planet.  At least mineral ones to begin with.

It is very difficult to create life.  But like you said with billions of galaxies each having billions of stars life should exist elsewhere.
I really hope we find it soon so we can get rid of that religious idea that the universe was build for mankind.
Some scientist think we can even find some form of life in our solar system  (in the ice on the poles of Mars, in subsurface seas on moons of Jupiter, ...)

About colonization I feel different : we abuse one planet, so instead of cleaning that one we just move to the next one to do the same thing there.
We can get minerals by mining asteroids without the need to live there.    I do support the scientific reasons to go to other planets.
We still have about 4 billion years before our sun goes into its red giant period so there is some time left ...

The fact that Earth seems destined to support human life is logical.  If some parameters were different we wouldn't be here to even think about all this.

Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: MetalDog on January 22, 2017, 07:08:36 AM
Thanks, E.  I have no basis in my belief other than sheer numbers.  Billions of Galaxies?  There HAS to be life out there.  Whether it looks like us or not, I don't know.  Might be.  Might not.  But the Mars rover just found mud remains and where there's mud remains, there was water and...you know the rest.

I've stated this on site before, I truly believe in order to survive, man is going to have to colonize the solar system.  Whether it's on space stations orbiting planets, in habitats on moons or planets or some combination.  But it needs to happen.  The human race is going to suck the planet Earth dry if we don't find alternate ways to live in harmony with the environment.  And part of that is going to be learning to get resources off planet.  At least mineral ones to begin with.

It is very difficult to create life.  But like you said with billions of galaxies each having billions of stars life should exist elsewhere.
I really hope we find it soon so we can get rid of that religious idea that the universe was build for mankind.
Some scientist think we can even find some form of life in our solar system  (in the ice on the poles of Mars, in subsurface seas on moons of Jupiter, ...)

About colonization I feel different : we abuse one planet, so instead of cleaning that one we just move to the next one to do the same thing there.
We can get minerals by mining asteroids without the need to live there.    I do support the scientific reasons to go to other planets.
We still have about 4 billion years before our sun goes into its red giant period so there is some time left ...

The fact that Earth seems destined to support human life is logical.  If some parameters were different we wouldn't be here to even think about all this.


My view on that is if we can figure out how to live on Earth and not purposely kill ourselves through pollution, deforestation, greenhouse gas, etc., we can learn to live anywhere.  The problem right now is having the incentive to do it.  You would think the warnings we've been getting the last 30 years would be enough, but, no.  The human race is like a student that has an exam in the morning that determines whether they pass or fail and not studying for it until five minutes before it's supposed to start.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Emeraldlis on January 22, 2017, 07:44:08 AM
Thanks, E.  I have no basis in my belief other than sheer numbers.  Billions of Galaxies?  There HAS to be life out there.  Whether it looks like us or not, I don't know.  Might be.  Might not.  But the Mars rover just found mud remains and where there's mud remains, there was water and...you know the rest.

I've stated this on site before, I truly believe in order to survive, man is going to have to colonize the solar system.  Whether it's on space stations orbiting planets, in habitats on moons or planets or some combination.  But it needs to happen.  The human race is going to suck the planet Earth dry if we don't find alternate ways to live in harmony with the environment.  And part of that is going to be learning to get resources off planet.  At least mineral ones to begin with.

It is very difficult to create life.  But like you said with billions of galaxies each having billions of stars life should exist elsewhere.
I really hope we find it soon so we can get rid of that religious idea that the universe was build for mankind.
Some scientist think we can even find some form of life in our solar system  (in the ice on the poles of Mars, in subsurface seas on moons of Jupiter, ...)

About colonization I feel different : we abuse one planet, so instead of cleaning that one we just move to the next one to do the same thing there.
We can get minerals by mining asteroids without the need to live there.    I do support the scientific reasons to go to other planets.
We still have about 4 billion years before our sun goes into its red giant period so there is some time left ...

The fact that Earth seems destined to support human life is logical.  If some parameters were different we wouldn't be here to even think about all this.


My view on that is if we can figure out how to live on Earth and not purposely kill ourselves through pollution, deforestation, greenhouse gas, etc., we can learn to live anywhere.  The problem right now is having the incentive to do it.  You would think the warnings we've been getting the last 30 years would be enough, but, no.  The human race is like a student that has an exam in the morning that determines whether they pass or fail and not studying for it until five minutes before it's supposed to start.

I really like your analogy of the student studying for exams five minutes beforehand , that made me smile MD , it's a great way to put it  O0 I agree with you and Pete , that we are abusing our planet , and that if something doesn't happen soon , there just won't be an earth here for us to even inhabit or live on anymore :( 
I know , like we've said , that water is essential to life . The earth had water on the planet before life appeared . But for a single cell to even be formed you need both proteins and enzymes , one can't exist without the other . It's the building block of a cell , and we are made from those cells . So it's great that they've found mud on Mars , and that means water ....but that still doesn't indicate life ,it  just indicates that if life was made there like us , then it could survive with water :) of course that life would then have to thrive in the conditions on Mars ...atmosphere and such .

I do think though , that even if we could get the resources off our planet and live elsewhere , we'd just wreck that place as well , if we can't take care of where  we already live , then how are we going to take care of any other planet ?

I honestly don't think there is any other life out there in the universe like ourselves with all the diversity we have on our planet . We've been around for millions of years according to scientists theory's , so why in all that time has there been no contact ? Of course people could say we've had ufo 's ......but it always surprises me with all of those stories , that aliens don't seem inclined to to show us how to travel , or stay put on the earth and learn us about there civilisations and where they live . They just seem to want to pick up one random person and probe their brain and dump them back on earth . For what purpose ? They're always painted as being more intelligent than us with technology , so surely they aren't learning much from us  ???

I do however hope that one day all of those galaxies and planets will be put to good use . I hope one day there will be more life around in the universe other than us , I just don't think at the moment that there is . Of course that's just my opinion , I totally respect both of your beliefs that you feel there could be life out there :)   O0

I do agree though
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on January 22, 2017, 09:23:26 AM

I honestly don't think there is any other life out there in the universe like ourselves with all the diversity we have on our planet . We've been around for millions of years according to scientists theory's , so why in all that time has there been no contact ? Of course people could say we've had ufo 's ......but it always surprises me with all of those stories , that aliens don't seem inclined to to show us how to travel , or stay put on the earth and learn us about there civilisations and where they live . They just seem to want to pick up one random person and probe their brain and dump them back on earth . For what purpose ? They're always painted as being more intelligent than us with technology , so surely they aren't learning much from us  ???

Making contact is no easy matter.  The star closest to us (Proxima Centauri) is more than 4 light-years away. (4.2 light-years, 40 trillion km, or 25 trillion miles !).  If life exist on the planet around this star it means any signal would take more than 4 years to reach us.  Should we detect it, it would take antother 4 years for our response to get tot them.  Not comfortable for communication.

Living beings traveling at lightspeed (if this even is possible) will come into contact with strange effects described by the theory of relativity.  When you travel a high speeds time goes slower for you than for the people who stay in place (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_dilation).
If you could travel to Proxima Centauri at lightspeed and make it back you would be 8 years gone but everybody you left behind would be dead.  Maybe others found other ways of travel but according to  Einstein's Theory of Relativity nothing can exceed the speed of light.  When we look at stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (approximately 160,000 light-years away- what still is near as far as astronomical distances go) what we see might already be long gone as it left that system 160,000 years ago. Closer to us, within 20 light-year, there are only some 50 stars and most of them are smaller ones. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_nearest_stars_and_brown_dwarfs

Why other civilizations didn't contact us ?
Let's say they took a look a few thousand years ago : 'we found a race and most of the time they spend killing each other'
They check back last century : 'they are still killing each other but they are getting better at it ...'
Maybe they don't contact us for the same reason you don't talk to ants : you don't see any use in it as you consider them to be inferior beings ...

There is also a small paradox in science : we use Keppler, Seti and others to look for alien civilizations but when someone claims they saw a UFO we try to prove them wrong and look for an earthly explanation.


Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Ubercat on January 22, 2017, 09:47:59 AM
... There is also a small paradox in science : we use Keppler, Seti and others to look for alien civilizations but when someone claims they saw a UFO we try to prove them wrong and look for an earthly explanation.

Great post!  I wouldn't call this a paradox, however. It's just the scientific method trying to keep us from getting egg on our faces.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: MetalDog on January 22, 2017, 10:03:50 AM
One thing I think people need to come to terms with is that humanity is a parasite.  If you imagine the earth as a single cell, and humanity as a virus on the outer cell wall, then you can view all of what we do to survive as bad for the cell.  All our activity is geared towards our own survival, so, how we use our environment determines how we live.  And even in a best case scenario, and we husband our resources like misers, there will come a day when there is no more iron, or gold, or oil, and so on and so on.  So, we'll have to find it somewhere else or die.  That means our solar system.  We need to get out there.  And soon.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on January 22, 2017, 10:38:30 AM
I wouldn't have called us parasites but yeah I agree we need to get off this tiny rock, and soon.

Actually colonizing another planet will be a extremely huge undertaking, as described but Jason elsewhere, and beyond our current capabilities, but we need to start with bases and mining operations on other stellar bodies. Once it commercially viable, and lucrative, the science will follow on quickly.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on January 22, 2017, 11:29:31 AM
One thing I think people need to come to terms with is that humanity is a parasite.  If you imagine the earth as a single cell, and humanity as a virus on the outer cell wall, then you can view all of what we do to survive as bad for the cell.  All our activity is geared towards our own survival, so, how we use our environment determines how we live.  And even in a best case scenario, and we husband our resources like misers, there will come a day when there is no more iron, or gold, or oil, and so on and so on.  So, we'll have to find it somewhere else or die.  That means our solar system.  We need to get out there.  And soon.

There is an alternative (not undisputed) view in science that claims all of this doesn't matter : the steady degeneration of human DNA would eventually lead to the total extinction of humanity given enough time.
The most pessimistic view gives us another 6000 years, optimists claim new science will fix the degeneration.  http://www.riseearth.com/2013/09/the-human-race-is-dying-dna.html?m=1#.Uul63WRdWkQ

About the resources : most can be recycled or replaced.   When pushed we seem to find new solutions (Cold fusion ?)
It is also safer and cheaper to mine asteroids by robots then sending humans there.   Unless you have an atmosphere and a magnetic field to protect you radiation in space can be deadly http://www.space.com/21353-space-radiation-mars-mission-threat.html
http://www.popularmechanics.com/space/moon-mars/a10732/can-we-protect-mars-explorers-from-deadly-cosmic-radiation-16887969/

Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: MetalDog on January 22, 2017, 11:55:54 AM
Thanks for the links, Pete.  Not real well read on the topic, I just know what human nature has revealed to me through the years and I am not optimistic.  I will say, there do seem to be turning points in time where we get it right.  I just pray we take the right direction when it presents itself.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on January 22, 2017, 12:06:28 PM
There is an alternative (not undisputed) view in science that claims all of this doesn't matter : the steady degeneration of human DNA would eventually lead to the total extinction of humanity given enough time.
The most pessimistic view gives us another 6000 years, optimists claim new science will fix the degeneration.  http://www.riseearth.com/2013/09/the-human-race-is-dying-dna.html?m=1#.Uul63WRdWkQ

^From the article:
Quote
One of the most interesting revelations in Genetic Entropy is Dr. Sanford’s and other workers’ analysis of the Biblical account of life expectancies. In a statistical regression analysis of declining lifespans since Noah (lived 950 years), after 32 centuries since Noah the life expectancy has declined to about 70. The remarkable aspect is that this curve, which shows a sharp drop-off after Noah and a more gradual decline about 1,000 years ago, is that it is very similar to theoretical curves presented by other researchers that show genetic degeneration. Either Moses faithfully recorded the events (and ages) recorded in Genesis, or he was a skilled statistician who made up data with a remarkable fit to an exponential curve!

Noah and his biblical lifespan are being used as a scientific benchmark? Really!?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on January 22, 2017, 12:06:32 PM
Cold fusion is a pipe dream... sadly....
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on January 22, 2017, 12:07:21 PM
http://waitbutwhy.com/2014/05/fermi-paradox.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Ubercat on January 22, 2017, 12:34:35 PM
There is an alternative (not undisputed) view in science that claims all of this doesn't matter : the steady degeneration of human DNA would eventually lead to the total extinction of humanity given enough time.
The most pessimistic view gives us another 6000 years, optimists claim new science will fix the degeneration.  http://www.riseearth.com/2013/09/the-human-race-is-dying-dna.html?m=1#.Uul63WRdWkQ

^From the article:
Quote
One of the most interesting revelations in Genetic Entropy is Dr. Sanford’s and other workers’ analysis of the Biblical account of life expectancies. In a statistical regression analysis of declining lifespans since Noah (lived 950 years), after 32 centuries since Noah the life expectancy has declined to about 70. The remarkable aspect is that this curve, which shows a sharp drop-off after Noah and a more gradual decline about 1,000 years ago, is that it is very similar to theoretical curves presented by other researchers that show genetic degeneration. Either Moses faithfully recorded the events (and ages) recorded in Genesis, or he was a skilled statistician who made up data with a remarkable fit to an exponential curve!

Noah and his biblical lifespan are being used as a scientific benchmark? Really!?

And yet another thing that bible god did a half-assed job on. Crappy DNA!  :clap:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on January 22, 2017, 01:12:27 PM
There is an alternative (not undisputed) view in science that claims all of this doesn't matter : the steady degeneration of human DNA would eventually lead to the total extinction of humanity given enough time.
The most pessimistic view gives us another 6000 years, optimists claim new science will fix the degeneration.  http://www.riseearth.com/2013/09/the-human-race-is-dying-dna.html?m=1#.Uul63WRdWkQ

^From the article:
Quote
One of the most interesting revelations in Genetic Entropy is Dr. Sanford’s and other workers’ analysis of the Biblical account of life expectancies. In a statistical regression analysis of declining lifespans since Noah (lived 950 years), after 32 centuries since Noah the life expectancy has declined to about 70. The remarkable aspect is that this curve, which shows a sharp drop-off after Noah and a more gradual decline about 1,000 years ago, is that it is very similar to theoretical curves presented by other researchers that show genetic degeneration. Either Moses faithfully recorded the events (and ages) recorded in Genesis, or he was a skilled statistician who made up data with a remarkable fit to an exponential curve!

Noah and his biblical lifespan are being used as a scientific benchmark? Really!?

Oh, sorry.   #:-) :pullhair:   I linked to the first thing I could find (without reading the full article  :uglystupid2:)    I am an atheist myself so please ignore that explanation.

This might be a bit better (I hope) : http://genetics.thetech.org/weakened-gene-pool  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26953265
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Emeraldlis on January 23, 2017, 04:46:55 PM

I honestly don't think there is any other life out there in the universe like ourselves with all the diversity we have on our planet . We've been around for millions of years according to scientists theory's , so why in all that time has there been no contact ? Of course people could say we've had ufo 's ......but it always surprises me with all of those stories , that aliens don't seem inclined to to show us how to travel , or stay put on the earth and learn us about there civilisations and where they live . They just seem to want to pick up one random person and probe their brain and dump them back on earth . For what purpose ? They're always painted as being more intelligent than us with technology , so surely they aren't learning much from us  ???

Making contact is no easy matter.  The star closest to us (Proxima Centauri) is more than 4 light-years away. (4.2 light-years, 40 trillion km, or 25 trillion miles !).  If life exist on the planet around this star it means any signal would take more than 4 years to reach us.  Should we detect it, it would take antother 4 years for our response to get tot them.  Not comfortable for communication.

Living beings traveling at lightspeed (if this even is possible) will come into contact with strange effects described by the theory of relativity.  When you travel a high speeds time goes slower for you than for the people who stay in place (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_dilation).
If you could travel to Proxima Centauri at lightspeed and make it back you would be 8 years gone but everybody you left behind would be dead.  Maybe others found other ways of travel but according to  Einstein's Theory of Relativity nothing can exceed the speed of light.  When we look at stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (approximately 160,000 light-years away- what still is near as far as astronomical distances go) what we see might already be long gone as it left that system 160,000 years ago. Closer to us, within 20 light-year, there are only some 50 stars and most of them are smaller ones. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_nearest_stars_and_brown_dwarfs

Why other civilizations didn't contact us ?
Let's say they took a look a few thousand years ago : 'we found a race and most of the time they spend killing each other'
They check back last century : 'they are still killing each other but they are getting better at it ...'
Maybe they don't contact us for the same reason you don't talk to ants : you don't see any use in it as you consider them to be inferior beings ...

There is also a small paradox in science : we use Keppler, Seti and others to look for alien civilizations but when someone claims they saw a UFO we try to prove them wrong and look for an earthly explanation.

Thanks for the links and the info :) I have read einsteins theory of relativity , it's quite a while ago though , so it's nice to have my memory refreshed . The stats you've given about the distances between stars is mind blowing , you definately know your stuff and it's great to have you pass that knowledge on to me and whoever else is intrested , I certainly find it all really intresting . What you've said just more or less cements my own belief that we are the only life in the universe . If there was other life out there , I just think we would have known about that a very long time ago . I hope that in time life will spread through the universe , but I think that it will be us doing the colonising. And quite frankly , we don't treat our own planet that well , so it fills me with dread to think that we'd be let loose on the universe , just to turn that into a wasteland :( I think there are a lot of problems to solve on earth first . But I'm an optimistic person , and I have faith that we aren't doomed !!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: GDS_Starfury on January 24, 2017, 12:36:54 AM
of course there is life out in the universe.  the problem isn't so much distance as time though.  over a mere billion years there could exist 100000 10000 year old cultures.  if they dont overlap, or are in close proximity then they might never know about each other.
I think there have been 100s, if not 1000s, of intelligent species running around this galaxy.
just not now, and not near us.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on January 24, 2017, 02:00:06 AM
This is Stephen Hawking's view (and I am with him on this  8) ):

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2010/apr/30/stephen-hawking-right-aliens
Hawking believes that, based on the sheer number of planets that scientists know must exist, we are not the only life-form in the universe.

If aliens visit us, the outcome would be much as when Columbus landed in America, which didn't turn out well for the Native Americans," Hawking has said in a forthcoming documentary made for the Discovery Channel. He argues that, instead of trying to find and communicate with life in the cosmos, humans would be better off doing everything they can to avoid contact.

http://www.nbcnews.com/science/space/im-atheist-stephen-hawking-god-space-travel-n210076

The idea that we are alone in the universe seems to me completely implausible and arrogant.

Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Emeraldlis on January 24, 2017, 05:14:20 AM
Then I'm obviously arrogant for having a different opinion  :) ......oh the audacity , to see something in a different way to other people !!!! I don't call you arrogant for having a different belief to me , I respect your right to believe whatever you wish , and I think that we should be able to have a discussion about those differences without you resorting to trying to shame someone else for their own beliefs .( you saying its implausible and arrogant , is a definate put down in my opinion )  If you want to believe there is life out there , fair enough . I just don't share that opinion , and that's fair enough too .
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on January 24, 2017, 05:35:53 AM
We are alone in the universe and it is Sherlock Holmes' fault (http://www.sfwriter.com/styousee.htm).
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on January 24, 2017, 06:23:24 AM
Then I'm obviously arrogant for having a different opinion  :) ......oh the audacity , to see something in a different way to other people !!!! I don't call you arrogant for having a different belief to me , I respect your right to believe whatever you wish , and I think that we should be able to have a discussion about those differences without you resorting to trying to shame someone else for their own beliefs .( you saying its implausible and arrogant , is a definate put down in my opinion )  If you want to believe there is life out there , fair enough . I just don't share that opinion , and that's fair enough too .

The words implausible and arrogant are not mine but are a quote of his statement.  Sorry if this gave you the idea I don't respect your or other views.  I only wanted to show that people who are A LOT smarter than me have this opinion.  Fact is for the moment we don't know.  I must admit that for me it is more that I hope there is something out there than that I know it.

Hawking uses the word arrogant in a more religious context.   Most (all ?) religions claim Earth is made by a god for the benefit of the human race.  If you are no longer alone in the universe the humans lose that exceptional status.    Refusing the idea that other species can exist solely based on religion and completely ignoring science could be viewed as arrogant in the eyes of nonbelievers.  It is true however that Steven Hawking became a bit more harsh in his opinions lately (being 100% paralyzed for years might have had an influence on that). 
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: MetalDog on January 24, 2017, 05:16:43 PM
We are alone in the universe and it is Sherlock Holmes' fault (http://www.sfwriter.com/styousee.htm).

That was a nice, quick, read.  I think the deduction and the outcome fit the spirit of Holmes and Watson perfectly.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Emeraldlis on January 24, 2017, 06:33:10 PM
This is Stephen Hawking's view (and I am with him on this  8) ):


The idea that we are alone in the universe seems to me completely implausible and arrogant.



Hi Pete , if I've misunderstood you , then I'm indeed very sorry for that . What made me see red , is that it seemed to me that you agreed with Hawkins statement , that anyone who took a different view to him is an arrogant person , and that their beliefs are more or less invalid . (Implausible)

I've never brought God or religion into this conversation that we've been having on this thread ,  I don't think that other life doesn't exist because of religious reasons . I think it doesn't exist because of looking at what science has explained so far . I don't ignore science AT ALL , I'm fascinated by science and what it can reveal about life , I have respect for scientific fact .

In the article link you put up , it states that both Stephen hawkins and Richard Dawkins don't believe in the existance of God , which is their personal belief , and they are entitled to believe that . There  are a lot of other scientists around who do have a belief in God , and don't see science conflicting with their belief in God . Of course both sets of scientists are smarter than me .....I get that !!!! But at the same time I'm not dumb either , and neither are you . I'm allowed to look at science and draw my own conclusions . Looking at science for you has maybe lead you in the direction of atheism , I honestly don't know , because I don't know you that well . For me , looking at science has lead me to the belief that there is a God. If I was a person with no respect for science , I wouldn't be on a science thread reading about and discussing science !!!!! Even though I believe in God , I'm open minded enough to explore other beliefs . I'm constantly checking other people's views and opinions against my own .

I'm sure you're  right about Stephen Hawkins , being in as much pain as he must be in , would definately make you say harsh things , maybe things that he doesn't mean or wishes he could take back . I do respect his scientific studies and I respect his mind . But for anyone to tell me what to personally believe , I think that's just overstepping the mark , because I have my own mind too .

I'm probably rambling now , lol , but I'm sorry to have misunderstood you . I really hope this clears the air between us .
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: MetalDog on January 24, 2017, 07:09:29 PM
I believe in God.  Wholeheartedly.  I believe that for God to exist, He has to be so far beyond our understanding as a universe is to a cell, that we can not fathom His ways.  I also believe that we are endowed with a sense of self and wonder leading us to use our God given reason to take in and explore all that God has made for us.  So, if God gave us reason and wonder, it is to our advantage and, ultimately to our benefit, to use them.  And that's where scientists come in. 

What does science do but attempt to grasp nature's law and define what the forces are acting upon us every day?  And in this pursuit, the brightest among us have come to answer upon answer.  One leading into the next.  All obeying laws and forces that lead us to further and greater discoveries.  And each time science comes to a conclusion, there always seems to be more questions raised.  And each time, through diligence, observation, intuition, and experiment, we find more answers.  That's because, to my mind, God has set this up for us to continue to strive and grow in our understanding.  To what purpose, I can only wonder, but, I would think that an orderly universe would only make scientists more aware of God than doubt His existence.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on January 25, 2017, 03:45:40 AM
This is Stephen Hawking's view (and I am with him on this  8) ):


The idea that we are alone in the universe seems to me completely implausible and arrogant.



Hi Pete , if I've misunderstood you , then I'm indeed very sorry for that . What made me see red , is that it seemed to me that you agreed with Hawkins statement

I'm probably rambling now , lol , but I'm sorry to have misunderstood you . I really hope this clears the air between us .


To be clear I'm with him on the idea that I believe/hope that there is something else out there.  For the moment we can't be sure so calling someone who believes we are alone to be arrogant is probably also arrogant.

By the way, science didn't lead me to atheism, I was born that way :2funny:.

I can only wonder, but, I would think that an orderly universe would only make scientists more aware of God than doubt His existence.

An orderly universe can lead you into thinking there is an 'intelligent design' behind it.   Another view on it is that if some things were even a bit different we wouldn't even be here to ponder about it.
So is there an orderly universe build to create us or are we here just because there happened to be an orderly universe ?

If we accept the multiverse theory (http://www.space.com/18811-multiple-universes-5-theories.html) there might exist many dead universes next to ours.
With many universes to experiment with it could be logical that live exists in a few of them.

I hope I made myself clear (it is not easy discussing these matters when English is your third language).
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: JasonPratt on January 26, 2017, 10:20:01 AM
Since I was briefly invoked earlier...  <:-)

My position is that if we want to colonize the solar system in any realistic fashion whatsoever, we must first learn to efficiently colonize the vast stretches of Terran landscape and seascape (and maybe even over and under the, um, scape). When I'm elected President, shortly before hell freezes over  >:D, I'm putting our R&T guys on those large-scale projects. Mars and the Moon can wait. We need to work on what we've got here.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: besilarius on January 27, 2017, 05:50:46 AM
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/hydrogen-metal-revolution-technology-space-rockets-superconductor-harvard-university-a7548221.html

And once again, part of my high school chemistry is turned on it's head.  The thermostat in hell must be really out of control these days.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on January 27, 2017, 05:57:15 AM
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/hydrogen-metal-revolution-technology-space-rockets-superconductor-harvard-university-a7548221.html

And once again, part of my high school chemistry is turned on it's head.  The thermostat in hell must be really out of control these days.

Or maybe not....

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/hydrogen-metal-revolution-technology-truth-criticism-problems-discussion-a7549056.html

Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Emeraldlis on January 27, 2017, 08:01:39 AM
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/hydrogen-metal-revolution-technology-space-rockets-superconductor-harvard-university-a7548221.html

And once again, part of my high school chemistry is turned on it's head.  The thermostat in hell must be really out of control these days.
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/hydrogen-metal-revolution-technology-space-rockets-superconductor-harvard-university-a7548221.html

And once again, part of my high school chemistry is turned on it's head.  The thermostat in hell must be really out of control these days.

Or maybe not....

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/hydrogen-metal-revolution-technology-truth-criticism-problems-discussion-a7549056.html



That would be a stunning piece of science if it turned out to be true  :o  I guess the old alchemists dream of turning base metal into gold has gone by the wayside then  ;D gas into metal......maybe ......who knew !!!!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: JasonPratt on January 27, 2017, 02:39:14 PM
As far as alternative energy goes, I would definitely invest in hydrogen compound research, or safer ways to controllably use and store hydrogen cells. Then we can still have wind and solar power, just being put to work making hydrogen from water. Water's the byproduct, it's (for all practical purposes) a zero-sum immediately renewable system.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on January 28, 2017, 11:57:30 AM
Time Crystals!

http://www.sciencealert.com/scientists-have-just-announced-a-brand-new-form-of-matter-time-crystals#.WIxnUCz_WZ8.twitter
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on January 28, 2017, 04:08:12 PM
^Sounds like a litter-box additive.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Emeraldlis on January 28, 2017, 07:08:20 PM
Very strange matter floating around in the universe sounds just about right !!! .......or even in the  litter box :)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on February 02, 2017, 10:43:49 AM
http://astrobob.areavoices.com/2017/01/30/gotta-see-it-four-planets-directly-imaged-in-motion-around-the-star-hr-8799/
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on February 02, 2017, 10:50:37 AM
OK, that's frickin cool!  :o  :bd:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on February 02, 2017, 10:51:23 AM
+100!!!! That is really impressive!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Emeraldlis on February 03, 2017, 09:10:57 AM
Wow , that's cool ....way to go Astro bob !!!!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on February 06, 2017, 05:13:55 AM
http://bigthink.com/philip-perry/nasas-squid-rover-plans-to-explore-the-seas-of-other-worlds
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Emeraldlis on February 06, 2017, 05:02:09 PM
It'll be interesting to find out if the robotic squid works and what data it comes up with , it's a novel concept , I like it . I think modelling the  design off the squids own natural system of jet propulsion is ingenious :)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on February 09, 2017, 09:55:02 AM
https://www.cnet.com/news/nasas-new-electronics-can-survive-the-heat-of-venus/
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on February 09, 2017, 10:09:35 AM
https://www.cnet.com/news/nasas-new-electronics-can-survive-the-heat-of-venus/

Venus isn't quite the crapshoot to land stuff on that Mars is. Just keeping stuff working once it's on the surface is the interesting bit.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Emeraldlis on February 09, 2017, 03:51:17 PM
https://www.cnet.com/news/nasas-new-electronics-can-survive-the-heat-of-venus/

Interesting that they can use that technology on earth as well  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on February 09, 2017, 04:03:12 PM
https://www.cnet.com/news/nasas-new-electronics-can-survive-the-heat-of-venus/

Interesting that they can use that technology on earth as well  O0

Mostly on overheating PC graphics cards!  :P
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Emeraldlis on February 09, 2017, 04:09:52 PM
Venus to the rescue  ;D NASA scientists WILL be pleased  :bd:  :D
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on February 10, 2017, 09:58:57 AM
http://www.economist.com/news/science-and-technology/21716599-film-worth-watching-how-keep-cool-without-costing-earth
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Rekim on February 18, 2017, 05:33:29 AM
Cross posting from the SpaceX thread

There is a Falcon 9 launch scheduled for this morning, to the ISS from KCS Launch Complex 39A. There is a ton of space history associated with this site, including most of the moon landings, which hasn't been used since the very last Shuttle launch. Spacex will once again attempt a first stage landing, close to the launch site. Should be interesting, as always. You can watch it live here ~10:00am EST

http://www.spacex.com/webcast

(https://cdn.arstechnica.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/DSC3170-1-980x652.jpg)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on February 23, 2017, 01:46:04 AM
TRAPPIST-1: System with 7 Earth-Size Exoplanets

http://www.space.com/35806-trappist-1-facts.html

The ultracool star TRAPPIST-1, located about 40 light-years from Earth, hosts at least seven exoplanets, most likely rocky worlds the size of Earth and smaller. The star boasts not only the largest number of Earth-like worlds in a single system known to date, but also the most planets that could host liquid water on their surfaces.

Ultimately, scientists say these seven newly identified Earth-size worlds offer the best bet yet for finding life outside our solar system.


Searching for Life on 7 Nearby Alien Worlds: How Scientists Will Do It

http://www.space.com/35793-trappist-1-earth-size-exoplanets-alien-life-search.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on February 23, 2017, 03:37:30 AM
(https://scontent.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/16938513_10154840387744845_7487041974931175932_n.jpg?oh=9be9ac1a180b79fef695083a0046a574&oe=59414E16)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on February 23, 2017, 03:47:44 AM
Best known for :

(https://images.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.trollekelder.be%2Fcafe%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2013%2F06%2Fwestmalle-tripel.jpg&f=1)


Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on February 24, 2017, 08:08:55 AM
If you are lucky enough to own Universe Sandbox2, they've added the Trappist-1 system (http://steamcommunity.com/games/230290/announcements/detail/680445313449575813) into the sim.   O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on February 27, 2017, 01:52:58 PM
A star that blew up
http://www.blastr.com/2017-2-27/30-years-after-star-blew-itself-shreds
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 27, 2017, 05:51:01 PM
Very cool article.  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on February 27, 2017, 06:02:14 PM
I just want a time-lapse that can make the whole thing go at sitcom speed instead of intergalactic speed....
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: GDS_Starfury on February 27, 2017, 06:19:18 PM
can I post a video of Star blowing up? 
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on February 27, 2017, 06:34:53 PM
can I post a video of Star blowing up? 

A two second video?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on February 27, 2017, 06:45:05 PM
SpaceX is going round the Moon in 2018 (http://www.foxnews.com/science/2017/02/27/moon-shot-spacex-announces-plans-to-send-2-private-citizens-around-moon.html).
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on February 27, 2017, 07:29:55 PM
SpaceX is going round the Moon in 2018 (http://www.foxnews.com/science/2017/02/27/moon-shot-spacex-announces-plans-to-send-2-private-citizens-around-moon.html).

With 2 space tourists on board! Man how'd I miss that selection period?!?  :timeout:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on February 27, 2017, 07:35:17 PM
SpaceX is going round the Moon in 2018 (http://www.foxnews.com/science/2017/02/27/moon-shot-spacex-announces-plans-to-send-2-private-citizens-around-moon.html).

With 2 space tourists on board! Man how'd I miss that selection period?!?  :timeout:


Did your $90 million check not clear?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on February 27, 2017, 07:38:37 PM
SpaceX is going round the Moon in 2018 (http://www.foxnews.com/science/2017/02/27/moon-shot-spacex-announces-plans-to-send-2-private-citizens-around-moon.html).

With 2 space tourists on board! Man how'd I miss that selection period?!?  :timeout:


Did your $90 million check not clear?

Basturds would check the validity of that wouldn't they....   :-\
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Bison on February 27, 2017, 07:58:09 PM
So...I should stop writing my scientific research paper confirming the flat earth theory...
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on February 27, 2017, 08:18:48 PM
So...I should stop writing my scientific research paper confirming the flat earth theory...

That's your ticket to a job as Trump's science advisor.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: MetalDog on February 27, 2017, 08:31:00 PM
Or Kyrie Irving's teacher.  Must be what they're teaching over there at Duke.  The latest scientific discoveries.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Bison on February 27, 2017, 09:04:52 PM
Or Kyrie Irving's teacher.  Must be what they're teaching over there at Duke.  The latest scientific discoveries.

I'm missing the reference.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: MetalDog on February 28, 2017, 05:00:50 AM
Kyrie Irving, the former Duke guard who now plays for the world champion Cleveland Cavaliers, just recently stated that he believes the world is flat.  As in seriously, no doubt about it, for reelz, the world is flat.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on February 28, 2017, 05:34:35 AM
Kyrie Irving, the former Duke guard who now plays for the world champion Cleveland Cavaliers, just recently stated that he believes the world is flat.  As in seriously, no doubt about it, for reelz, the world is flat.

that's a Duke education for you O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Bison on February 28, 2017, 10:17:43 AM
Kyrie Irving, the former Duke guard who now plays for the world champion Cleveland Cavaliers, just recently stated that he believes the world is flat.  As in seriously, no doubt about it, for reelz, the world is flat.

Huh.  No better source than a basketball player and a Duke educated one at that talk about pedigree.  :D
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on February 28, 2017, 10:50:04 AM
Dust devils on Mars.

Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on February 28, 2017, 10:51:47 AM
Martian Tasmanian Devil!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on February 28, 2017, 12:03:19 PM
Dust devils. Right. If you look close you can clearly see the Mad Max-like vehicles kicking up the dust!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: JasonPratt on March 03, 2017, 10:27:36 AM
Ultimately, scientists say these seven newly identified Earth-size worlds offer the best bet yet for finding life outside our solar system.

Earth-sized does not mean Earth-like (regardless whether the promo text says so ;) ), except in one of the most trivial (though still necessary) senses. I strenuously doubt an ultra-cool star would offer the best bet yet for finding life outside our solar system either, even if seven hundred Earth-sized rocks orbit it. At best one, maaaaaybe two of those planets stand the faintest possible chances.

(Come to think of it, we already have plenty of Earth-sized (more or less) rocky globes potentially capable of water at cool-star distances from the sun.)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on March 22, 2017, 05:19:20 PM
https://twitter.com/Thom_astro/status/844262342204493827
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on March 22, 2017, 05:23:53 PM
Cool! ... and Hot!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Bison on March 22, 2017, 05:27:22 PM
I support volcano rights to spew hot molten lava.  I just don't want to be on the mountain when it decides to blow.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: MetalDog on April 04, 2017, 09:25:04 PM
Pretty big batch of exoplanets being announced tomorrow:

http://www.digitaltrends.com/cool-tech/nasa-exoplanet-discovery/
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on April 05, 2017, 08:22:36 AM
That's a whole bunch of new names to come up with. Are there that many important people to have names for all of them, and the many more to come? Do you think there will ever be a "GrogHeads Constellation" to immortalize us?  ???
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: MetalDog on April 06, 2017, 08:14:08 PM
The Star Registry will let you name a star for a fee.  Don't think it ever becomes "official," though.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on April 07, 2017, 01:43:18 AM
The Star Registry will let you name a star for a fee.  Don't think it ever becomes "official," though.

If no one else in the universe claims it in the next 10.000 years it is officially yours.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on April 11, 2017, 06:00:42 PM
(https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/styles/full_width_feature/public/thumbnails/image/pia21338.png?itok=4RnrrP8-)

https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/jpl/pia21338/when-jovian-light-and-dark-collide
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: OJsDad on April 17, 2017, 08:46:40 AM
NASA has released new images of Earth at night.

Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on April 17, 2017, 09:01:42 AM
Now the Aliens can find us at night.  :o
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on April 18, 2017, 09:03:49 AM
Clothes dryer that doesn't use heat

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/scientists-invented-dryer-dry-clothes-170600085.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on April 18, 2017, 02:10:14 PM
But will it FOLD the clothes after they're dry? That's what I been waiting on.  :dreamer:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on April 18, 2017, 05:37:34 PM
^That's why you need a stack of pre-paid-minutes cards and kids with a cell-phone jones. Also good for yard work, car washing, etc...
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on April 18, 2017, 07:54:23 PM
My daughter practically stood on her head for three weeks when she found out my iPhone6 contract was coming up and it was still in great shape.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on April 19, 2017, 02:26:32 PM
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/19/science/exoplanet-signs-of-life.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on April 19, 2017, 09:35:51 PM
Excellent news. A dongle-free world.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on April 23, 2017, 10:01:31 PM
A new type of aurora (http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-39686055) and it was named after me :bd: (ok, not really, but it was named "Steve").

(https://ichef-1.bbci.co.uk/news/660/cpsprodpb/82A5/production/_95754433_steve.jpg)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on April 24, 2017, 09:16:28 AM
It's also called, "The Death Star---- Steve".  ;D
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Rekim on April 24, 2017, 06:50:43 PM
Over the weekend, the Cassini space probe made its closest, and final, pass over Saturn's largest moon, Titan. This image was taken from < 600 miles above

(http://static4.businessinsider.com/image/58fe46e60ba0b8c6008b5abe-1011/titan-moon-magic-island-cassini-april-22-2017-kevin-gill-flickr-ccbysa2-34055431151d9736dac15o.jpg)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on May 05, 2017, 06:21:45 AM
https://phys.org/news/2017-05-iceland-drills-km-volcano-energy.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on May 26, 2017, 03:20:09 AM
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/25/science/nasa-juno-spacecraft-jupiter-storms.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on May 26, 2017, 10:20:29 AM
Very interesting report. Thanks for the post.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on May 26, 2017, 10:31:36 AM
It's really amazing what Juno is sending back.

And the stuff from Cassini is pretty wild too

Quote
Planetary scientists had wondered whether Jupiter would have a giant hexagonal pattern like that spotted on Saturn by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft.On Wednesday, NASA released new images of Saturn’s north polar region, which has changed color in the last four years, possibly because summer has reached the northern hemisphere.

(https://static01.nyt.com/science/gifs/Saturn_hex_600.gif)

Quote
In contrast to the chaotic weather patterns at Jupiter’s poles, a stable hexagonal pattern covers Saturn’s north pole. A comparison of Saturn's north-polar region in 2013, left, and 2017, right. As the gas giant approached its summer solstice, the sun's ultraviolet light led to a yellow-ish haze.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: besilarius on May 27, 2017, 08:05:39 AM
It's not all sweetness and light in the Bat Cave.

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/researchers-translate-bat-talk-and-they-argue-lot-180961564/?utm_source=keywee-facebook.com&utm_medium=socialmedia&utm_campaign=keywee&kwp_0=415763&kwp_4=1539074&kwp_1=668514
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on May 28, 2017, 07:01:58 AM
Construction begins on world's largest telescope in Chilean desert (https://www.reuters.com/article/us-chile-telescope-idUSKBN18M2JX)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Nefaro on May 28, 2017, 06:23:46 PM
Juno's Jovian flyby vids...

 :dreamer:

A couple pretty close passes.  Putting on some serious speed.  :o


Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on May 31, 2017, 07:28:17 AM
Not cool in science :

Australia's Great Barrier Reef lost nearly a third of its corals in the past year, officials have said.

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-40094160
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on June 01, 2017, 04:40:30 PM
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/01/science/black-holes-collision-ligo-gravitational-waves.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on June 01, 2017, 05:00:27 PM
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on June 01, 2017, 05:35:51 PM
I recall reading about that a while ago, that the lightening bolt actually drew the last bit of electricity up to itself from the object struck.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: GDS_Starfury on June 01, 2017, 11:12:54 PM
It's really amazing what Juno is sending back.

And the stuff from Cassini is pretty wild too

Quote
Planetary scientists had wondered whether Jupiter would have a giant hexagonal pattern like that spotted on Saturn by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft.On Wednesday, NASA released new images of Saturn’s north polar region, which has changed color in the last four years, possibly because summer has reached the northern hemisphere.

(https://static01.nyt.com/science/gifs/Saturn_hex_600.gif)

It should be called the Eye of Grognati.

Quote
In contrast to the chaotic weather patterns at Jupiter’s poles, a stable hexagonal pattern covers Saturn’s north pole. A comparison of Saturn's north-polar region in 2013, left, and 2017, right. As the gas giant approached its summer solstice, the sun's ultraviolet light led to a yellow-ish haze.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on June 07, 2017, 11:48:58 AM
http://www.iflscience.com/space/the-wow-signal-was-likely-the-radio-emission-of-a-comet/
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on June 29, 2017, 07:13:49 PM
http://gizmodo.com/saturn-s-hexagonal-storm-is-pure-chaotic-beauty-in-new-1796523472
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on June 29, 2017, 08:30:59 PM
Those pictures either look like giant Space Boobs or else I've been here alone too long..... again.  :-[
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on June 29, 2017, 08:33:28 PM
Both of those can be true. They are not mutually exclusive.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on July 05, 2017, 11:33:44 AM
The eruption from a volcano we can't find
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20170630-the-massive-volcano-that-scientists-cant-find
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on July 05, 2017, 05:15:21 PM
Enceladus knows how to party

http://gizmodo.com/saturns-moon-enceladus-has-toxic-booze-on-its-breath-1796640654
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on July 05, 2017, 05:44:56 PM
The eruption from a volcano we can't find
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20170630-the-massive-volcano-that-scientists-cant-find

I was around at that time. It was an asteroid impact.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on July 05, 2017, 05:51:50 PM
The eruption from a volcano we can't find
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20170630-the-massive-volcano-that-scientists-cant-find

I was around at that time. It was an asteroid impact.

Tell the truth, it was you breaking wind.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on July 06, 2017, 09:03:20 AM
Enceladus: The Solar System's Alcoholic Water-Fountain.  It's just what this system's been needing.  <:-)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on July 06, 2017, 11:25:51 AM
You all shouldn't be worried about me making black holes with the LHC.... this is scary!  :o

https://www6.slac.stanford.edu/news/2017-05-31-world%E2%80%99s-most-powerful-x-ray-laser-beam-creates-%E2%80%98molecular-black-hole%E2%80%99.aspx
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on July 06, 2017, 11:30:49 AM
I wish you science guys would stop trying to destroy the universe.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on July 06, 2017, 11:31:45 AM
There are lots more out there.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on July 06, 2017, 11:38:02 AM
I wish you science guys would stop trying to destroy the universe.


Just a bunch of assholes always trying to prove shit
(http://i.imgur.com/DkFJjLh.jpg)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on July 06, 2017, 11:45:18 AM
Just a bunch of assholes always trying to prove shit

That's on every diploma we hand out.  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on July 06, 2017, 12:23:28 PM
There are lots more out there.

I need to try some of the other ones.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on July 06, 2017, 12:47:17 PM
Just jump into one of our black holes.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on July 06, 2017, 12:52:42 PM
Last time I did that, I ended up with two kids and a divorce.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on July 06, 2017, 01:06:55 PM
Last time I did that, I ended up with two kids and a divorce.

so 2 good things for each 1 bad...?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on July 06, 2017, 01:13:31 PM
Last time I did that, I ended up with two kids and a divorce.

so 2 good things for each 1 bad...?

3 good things
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on July 06, 2017, 06:02:11 PM
This is the 'Mirth Divorce Dimension'? Shit, I thought this was the one where he was Pope.  :o
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on July 06, 2017, 06:46:47 PM
This is the 'Mirth Divorce Dimension'? Shit, I thought this was the one where he was Pope.  :o

The one where Pope Mirth has a beard.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on July 06, 2017, 07:31:46 PM
I wish you science guys would stop trying to destroy the universe.

It is one of the solutions to the Fermi Paradox.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on July 06, 2017, 07:36:35 PM
The 'Doesn't live here anymore' theorem.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on July 08, 2017, 11:26:06 AM
It is one of the solutions to the Fermi Paradox.

https://waitbutwhy.com/2014/05/fermi-paradox.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on July 10, 2017, 10:30:28 PM
NASA Jupiter Probe to Fly Over Great Red Spot (https://www.space.com/37438-juno-flying-over-jupiter-great-red-spot.html)

...can't wait to see some pics!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on July 11, 2017, 04:25:30 AM
NASA Jupiter Probe to Fly Over Great Red Spot (https://www.space.com/37438-juno-flying-over-jupiter-great-red-spot.html)

...can't wait to see some pics!

First picture from a bit further out is already in:

(http://www.aarcentral.com/pics/grs.png)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on July 11, 2017, 01:12:22 PM
^ :2funny:

...but seems like it'll be a few more days (July 14th) before we get to see any closer in pics.

Quote
The first images are expected to be available to terrestrial viewers like you and me on 14 July.

https://cosmosmagazine.com/space/juno-spacecraft-completes-successful-great-red-spot-flyover
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on July 13, 2017, 11:22:13 AM
Movie encoded in DNA (http://www.foxnews.com/health/2017/07/13/movie-encoded-in-dna-in-first-step-to-molecular-recorders-scientists-say.html)  :o  (https://media.giphy.com/media/mzVCWPsjJwcRa/giphy.gif)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on July 15, 2017, 05:15:58 AM
an element with s half-life longer than the ages of the universe

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/rarest-nucleus-reluctant-decay
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on July 20, 2017, 06:36:07 AM
NASA published an archive of flight tests to Youtube

http://newatlas.com/nasa-youtube-video-archive/50555/
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on July 22, 2017, 10:46:29 PM
NASA Jupiter Probe to Fly Over Great Red Spot (https://www.space.com/37438-juno-flying-over-jupiter-great-red-spot.html)

...can't wait to see some pics!

Almost forgot about this.  More pics here (https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam/processing/).

(http://d2xkkdgjnsfvb0.cloudfront.net/Vault/Thumb?VaultID=10434&Interlaced=1&Mode=R&ResX=960&OutputFormat=jpg&Quality=90&t=1500308580)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on August 03, 2017, 06:22:07 PM
http://gizmodo.com/physicists-prove-40-year-old-prediction-with-incredible-1797451045
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on August 06, 2017, 09:23:50 AM
http://gizmodo.com/an-extremely-surprising-storm-system-just-appeared-over-1797535257
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on August 06, 2017, 10:10:15 AM
http://gizmodo.com/an-extremely-surprising-storm-system-just-appeared-over-1797535257

Alien weapons test. Time to start hiding our faster AFVs and attack jets in deep tunnels.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on August 06, 2017, 10:51:49 AM
(http://2damnfunny.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Sigourney-Weaver-Aliens-Meme.jpg)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on August 06, 2017, 02:44:13 PM
Ha!

Believe it or not she is actually in a new Neil Blomkamp short film about humans fighting a guerilla war against alien invaders.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt6990734/?ref_=ttmi_tt


Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on August 06, 2017, 02:50:19 PM
Is the Blomkamp movie back on? Everything I read recently was that it was pretty well dead.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on August 15, 2017, 02:23:14 PM
Quote
It's Pythagorean Theorem Day! Today's date is 8/15/17 or 8² + 15²=17². The next Pythagorean Day isn't until 12/16/20!

(https://scontent-iad3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/20799899_1669403536427786_8695519636347383908_n.jpg?oh=6fa36071e6a21106b900ebc509a13d17&oe=5A2914A6)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on August 15, 2017, 09:24:58 PM
Damn! I forgot to get the wife a card.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on August 15, 2017, 09:26:09 PM
Damn! I forgot to get the wife a card.

You need to learn the angles.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on August 15, 2017, 09:35:45 PM
You're right. I'll see if I can get that squared-away next year so the circle isn't complete.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on August 15, 2017, 09:38:03 PM
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on August 19, 2017, 02:31:38 PM
oceans of the sky


click to enlarge
(https://scontent-iad3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t31.0-8/20934242_1456609034405669_7033962038126941525_o.jpg?oh=ad34600a3660e2e92ba61697c2b843c1&oe=5A163767)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on August 19, 2017, 02:34:16 PM
^damn. Most awesome.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on September 05, 2017, 06:22:26 AM
https://www.space.com/38041-voyager-1-farthest-spacecraft-40-years-in-space.html

Voyager 1, humanity's farthest spacecraft, marks 40 years in space (lifted off on Sept. 5, 1977).
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on September 07, 2017, 08:15:26 AM
The Asteroid That Just Came Close to Earth Is So Huge It Has Its Own Moons

http://www.sciencealert.com/the-asteroid-that-just-buzzed-earth-is-a-rare-double-mooner

Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on September 07, 2017, 08:19:32 AM
Isn't that what they call Gus? The Ole Double Mooner.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on September 07, 2017, 01:34:27 PM
That's no moon! It's a....... I won't say it.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on September 07, 2017, 06:30:42 PM
That's no moon! It's a....... I won't say it.

Kardashian asscheek?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on September 07, 2017, 09:46:14 PM
That's a full moon.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on September 08, 2017, 04:08:28 PM
http://m.ndtv.com/world-news/secret-life-may-thrive-under-warm-antarctic-caves-study-1747694
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on September 08, 2017, 04:12:07 PM
http://m.ndtv.com/world-news/secret-life-may-thrive-under-warm-antarctic-caves-study-1747694 (http://m.ndtv.com/world-news/secret-life-may-thrive-under-warm-antarctic-caves-study-1747694)

I learned all about this in the AvP documentary.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on September 11, 2017, 06:37:48 AM
farewell Cassini

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/08/science/cassini-saturn-nasa.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on September 16, 2017, 06:07:17 AM
Twitter fight between British museums

http://www.iflscience.com/editors-blog/the-science-museum-and-the-natural-history-museum-are-fighting-on-twitter-and-its-amazing/
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on September 16, 2017, 06:18:17 AM
 O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on September 28, 2017, 04:26:59 AM
Black hole collisions

https://phys.org/news/2017-09-ligo-virgo-observatories-black-hole.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on September 28, 2017, 08:14:54 AM
Why do we HAVE TO have the word 'black' associated with violent images in deep space? I thought we had moved passed that in this day and age. Sad day.  :P :P :P
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: BanzaiCat on September 28, 2017, 08:16:30 AM
It's okay if Neil deGrasse Tyson says it, though.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on September 28, 2017, 12:33:25 PM
Well, OK then.  :notworthy:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on September 29, 2017, 08:26:43 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2017/09/29/sunken-8th-continent-reveals-its-buried-secrets.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on October 01, 2017, 08:33:54 AM
Big Bang wasn't the start?

https://medium.com/starts-with-a-bang/the-big-bang-wasnt-the-beginning-after-all-81844b973333

Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on October 04, 2017, 09:25:37 AM
That's just fragged up... I can warp my Newtonian brain around the big bang, but that pre-bang shit just gives me a serious migraine
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bob48 on October 04, 2017, 09:33:43 AM
I'm with you there, Windi.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on October 04, 2017, 10:10:34 AM
I'm with you there, Windi.

In my world there are normal people and then there's brilliant people who can understand and use calculus.  I am strictly cave man.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bob48 on October 04, 2017, 11:27:38 AM
So those are your wall paintings then?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on October 04, 2017, 01:06:22 PM
I have not one artistic bone in my body. Although I have painted the town red in my youth.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bob48 on October 04, 2017, 01:12:20 PM
Ah, youth! I think I had one of those, once.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: BanzaiCat on October 04, 2017, 01:30:13 PM
Ah, youth! I think I had one of those, once.

Nope. The Kaiser stole that, too.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bob48 on October 04, 2017, 02:20:36 PM
Ah, so! That's where it went!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on October 18, 2017, 04:38:53 PM
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/16/science/neutron-star-ligo.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on October 19, 2017, 09:01:24 AM
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/17/science/volcanoes-ancient-egypt-revolts.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on October 19, 2017, 02:20:24 PM
https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/oct/19/lunar-cave-discovery-raises-hopes-for-human-colonisation-of-moon (https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/oct/19/lunar-cave-discovery-raises-hopes-for-human-colonisation-of-moon)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on October 19, 2017, 02:21:47 PM
https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/oct/19/lunar-cave-discovery-raises-hopes-for-human-colonisation-of-moon (https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/oct/19/lunar-cave-discovery-raises-hopes-for-human-colonisation-of-moon)

If he were here The Doctor would warn against going in there.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on October 19, 2017, 05:13:46 PM
And then promptly go in himself.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on October 19, 2017, 05:18:32 PM
Exactly
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on October 19, 2017, 05:38:18 PM
https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/oct/19/lunar-cave-discovery-raises-hopes-for-human-colonisation-of-moon (https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/oct/19/lunar-cave-discovery-raises-hopes-for-human-colonisation-of-moon)

Here's the real question - after all the sci-fi movies you've seen over the last 50 years, do you want to be the first astronaut to venture into a space cave, and see what's in there?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on October 19, 2017, 05:48:57 PM
Better to be the guys outside the cave holding the lifeline, waiting for 'three sharp tugs'. To the cave explorer it means 'haul me out ASAP'. To the the guys outside it means 'let go the line, toss in the thermite charges, and bunny-hop like crazy back to the drop-ship'.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: GDS_Starfury on October 19, 2017, 06:32:04 PM
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on October 24, 2017, 01:51:21 AM
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-41729297

Paris accord: US and Syria alone as Nicaragua signs.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on October 24, 2017, 09:00:01 AM
Happy for Ortega. Bet he got something 'nice' for signing. My church sends shoes to children who live in what the Nicaraguan government promised the peasants would be a recycling paradise if they gave-up their farms and moved to the place. The peasants for years have been there trying to squeeze-out an existence picking through the garbage dumped there from all over the country. The children, many orphans, play, eat, and live amongst the garbage without shoes. The only thing being recycled there is Ortega's empty promises and his "Rock Star" image among the Global Elites.  L:-)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on October 24, 2017, 09:04:17 AM
https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/the-disinformation-playbook-on-steroids-trump-style/

The Disinformation Playbook on Steroids, Trump Style.

What was the point at which industry influence got the upper hand over science in the federal government?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on October 24, 2017, 09:10:20 AM
What was the point at which industry influence got the upper hand over science in the federal government?

when people decided their jobs were being impacted by accurate, but inconvenient science, and started shopping for their own "facts"
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on October 24, 2017, 01:14:38 PM
Here, here!  :clap:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on October 24, 2017, 04:41:11 PM
https://twitter.com/MilHistNow/status/922808705044893696
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on October 24, 2017, 05:45:29 PM
That could have been the view from a Sanger 'Silverbird (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silbervogel)' on it's way to bomb the US had history been different.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on October 24, 2017, 05:49:41 PM
Very cool stuff guys.  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on October 27, 2017, 07:37:21 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2017/10/27/mysterious-object-from-deep-space-has-entered-solar-system.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on October 27, 2017, 07:38:49 AM
mysterious-object-from-deep-space-has-entered-solar-system

yeah, we elected him president  ;D
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bob48 on October 27, 2017, 08:03:05 AM
ROFL  ;D
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on October 27, 2017, 08:11:12 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2017/10/27/mysterious-object-from-deep-space-has-entered-solar-system.html

Sounds like the Vegans are hurling rocks at us.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on October 27, 2017, 08:14:57 AM
It's the Vegans coming back for all their shitty cars they left here in the 70's. Boy are they gonna be pissed when they find out we chunked them all in the landfill.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on November 02, 2017, 09:30:04 AM
3D-Printing Marine-Grade Steel

https://news.thomasnet.com/featured/3d-printing-marine-grade-steel?channel=newsletter&campaign_type=PNA&campaign_name=1117&utm_campaign=1117&utm_medium=newsletter&utm_source=PNA&TINID=
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on November 02, 2017, 09:50:37 AM
^that is cool!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on November 02, 2017, 10:05:05 AM
I saw Glen Beck talking about this kind of thing on his show years ago. I thought, "What the hell is he talking about"? Now I see what he was talking about. Now maybe somebody can 3-D print the PERFECT BLT.  :notworthy:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on November 05, 2017, 06:56:05 PM
the effect space has on your genetic makeup

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/science/nasa-twins-study-spots-thousands-of-genes-toggling-on-and-off-in-scott-kelly
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on November 22, 2017, 07:56:39 AM
A long strider.

http://www.foxnews.com/science/2017/11/22/110-giant-steps-long-necked-dinosaur-breaks-record-for-longest-trackway.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on November 22, 2017, 12:06:19 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2017/10/27/mysterious-object-from-deep-space-has-entered-solar-system.html

That's no asteroid! ... Ok well maybe it is but it's a very odd shape....

https://www.theweathernetwork.com/news/articles/first-interstellar-asteroid-unlike-anything-ever-seen/89661/

(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4523/38520026072_b2052d7622_o.jpg)
Quote
This artist's illustration shows the asteroid's high-elongated shape. Anyone read the sci-fi novel 'Rendezvous with Rama'? Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on November 22, 2017, 12:53:26 PM
I think that's the whale probe from Star Trek IV.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on November 22, 2017, 01:48:24 PM
Maybe the "Planet-Killer" from the original series.  :hide:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on November 22, 2017, 02:16:00 PM
^Oooh, that's even better!  :clap:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on November 22, 2017, 06:19:16 PM
I saw that in the news the other day. Luckily there were no sightings of small pachyderms in space suits with multi-appendaged prehensile trunks.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Nefaro on November 23, 2017, 12:06:34 AM
Very interesting.

As if, perhaps, Oumuamua was a sliver ejected from an extrasolar collision long ago. 

The reported makeup (no water/ice) and color (red) is also interesting regarding it's long exposure to radiation throughout it's travels.

Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on November 24, 2017, 09:05:06 AM
New bird species

http://www.sciencealert.com/darwin-s-finches-evolve-into-new-species-in-real-time-two-generations-galapagos
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on November 25, 2017, 04:31:06 AM
http://www.newsweek.com/mars-antarctica-don-juan-pond-720173
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on November 25, 2017, 08:36:26 AM
Cool, but weird.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on November 25, 2017, 09:25:30 AM
Looks like more of a hot tub.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on November 29, 2017, 11:21:24 AM
New bird species

http://www.sciencealert.com/darwin-s-finches-evolve-into-new-species-in-real-time-two-generations-galapagos

Jeebus that was fast.   Better watch out with all them southern cousins. It possibly could explain a few things... but that's conjecture.   ^-^
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on November 29, 2017, 01:50:34 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2017/11/29/ancient-helmet-wearing-wormy-creature-was-covered-in-cocktail-sticks.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on November 30, 2017, 09:10:34 AM
I guess antimatter is being made naturally.

http://www.foxnews.com/science/2017/11/30/lightning-bolts-are-churning-out-antimatter-all-over-planet-earth.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on November 30, 2017, 11:43:18 AM
So basically, Planet Earth is one big Star Trek Enterprise Warp Drive. Scotty, pass me the bottle!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on December 01, 2017, 01:47:45 PM
I guess antimatter is being made naturally.

http://www.foxnews.com/science/2017/11/30/lightning-bolts-are-churning-out-antimatter-all-over-planet-earth.html

antimatter=negatively charged ions in FOX's world.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on December 07, 2017, 02:29:02 AM
https://amp.space.com/39000-oldest-farthest-monster-black-hole-yet.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Emeraldlis on December 10, 2017, 06:13:20 AM
https://www.space.com/34921-geminid-meteor-shower-guide.html

Shooting stars  :dreamer:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on December 10, 2017, 06:42:49 AM
^I read Day of the Triffids. I ain't looking!  :hide:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Emeraldlis on December 10, 2017, 07:18:48 AM
Ah, go on bbmike, live life on the edge  ;D think of all the pretty stars you'll miss if you don't  :dreamer:  <:-)  :bd:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on December 10, 2017, 07:27:32 AM
(http://www.aarcentral.com/pics/dt.jpg)

Nooooooooooooooooooooooooooo!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on December 10, 2017, 07:46:42 AM
Mike's had some...let's call them...bad experiences with plants
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Emeraldlis on December 11, 2017, 08:48:16 AM
Did he kill some plants he was supposed to take care of... And now they're coming back to get there revenge, from the furthest reaches of outer space !  :knuppel2:  ;D
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: GDS_Starfury on December 12, 2017, 03:52:36 PM
Mike's had some...let's call them...bad experiences with plants

are mushrooms plants?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on December 12, 2017, 06:15:08 PM
Mike's had some...let's call them...bad experiences with plants

are mushrooms plants?

Technically they are fungi, thus neither plant or animal (flora or fauna).
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Emeraldlis on December 14, 2017, 08:50:17 AM
Mike's had some...let's call them...bad experiences with plants

are mushrooms plants?

Sounds like its the day of the triffids every day then for bbmike  :wow:

Mike's had some...let's call them...bad experiences with plants

are mushrooms plants?

Technically they are fungi, thus neither plant or animal (flora or fauna).


Not the kind of fungi you have with your scrambled egg every morning for breakfast then  ;D
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on December 14, 2017, 08:55:03 AM
An old shark.

http://www.ibtimes.com/512-year-old-shark-believed-be-oldest-living-vertebrate-found-north-atlantic-2628368
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on December 14, 2017, 09:00:37 AM
An old shark.

http://www.ibtimes.com/512-year-old-shark-believed-be-oldest-living-vertebrate-found-north-atlantic-2628368


He shall be named Bawb.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on December 14, 2017, 09:02:50 AM
Bawb caught it once but threw it back because it was too small to keep.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Emeraldlis on December 14, 2017, 09:11:48 AM
It's the mythical Irish salmon of knowledge, masquerading as a shark...... It knows ALL  :notworthy:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on December 14, 2017, 11:46:50 AM
You have to be careful with sharks. They lie about their age.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on December 18, 2017, 01:44:47 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2017/12/18/in-2018-will-see-black-hole-for-first-time-ever.html

Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on December 26, 2017, 07:08:06 AM
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2017/06/explore-3D-painting/
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Emeraldlis on December 26, 2017, 03:45:19 PM
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2017/06/explore-3D-painting/

That’s a really lovely article  :smitten: I’m a big art lover , and to see that they’ve found a way to help blind people appreciate stunning works of art , in a tactile way , is very heart warming  :clap: great find Mirth , enjoyed the read  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on January 01, 2018, 08:48:07 AM
http://www.foxnews.com//science/2018/01/01/60-million-year-old-meteor-strike-uncovered-on-remote-isle-skye.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on January 02, 2018, 01:33:54 PM
Mmmmm, niobium.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on January 09, 2018, 11:04:22 AM
https://twitter.com/thinkgeek/status/950789273963417600
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on January 09, 2018, 11:17:49 AM
Now I see where van Gogh got his inspiration.  Who know he had access to such an advanced telescope  ???

(http://nerdist.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/juno-jupiter.jpg)(http://www.theartstory.org/images20/works/van_gogh_vincent_7.jpg?1)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on January 09, 2018, 05:53:27 PM
Turns out Jupiter is just one big Lava Lamp.  :o
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Emeraldlis on January 10, 2018, 05:29:42 PM
Damn. Those lamps are memorising   :o  van gogh might never have painted anything resembling jupiter, if he'd have had one of those in his apartment! Might have calmed him down too... .. Saved him from chopping off an ear  :hide:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on January 10, 2018, 09:47:44 PM
I heard that was to impress his girlfriend. Back in the day when self mutilation impressed women. Boy, have things changed? Try sending a girl an ear or even a couple of fingers today and see how far it gets you. Today it's got to be at least a major organ or two. And they still want the toilet seat left up.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: trailrunner on January 11, 2018, 04:21:42 AM
I heard that was to impress his girlfriend. Back in the day when self mutilation impressed women. Boy, have things changed? Try sending a girl an ear or even a couple of fingers today and see how far it gets you. Today it's got to be at least a major organ or two. And they still want the toilet seat left up.

With cellphones, we can just sext the image we want to send.  No need to cut off an ear anymore.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Emeraldlis on January 11, 2018, 08:57:05 AM
I heard that was to impress his girlfriend. Back in the day when self mutilation impressed women. Boy, have things changed? Try sending a girl an ear or even a couple of fingers today and see how far it gets you. Today it's got to be at least a major organ or two. And they still want the toilet seat left up.

....  :DD All she probably said to him, is that every now and then she'd like a listening ear. And the romantic in him took it literally instead of metaphorically! Or maybe she just really liked his ear, some woman are kinky that way  ;D And the toilet seat being left in the correct position, just goes without saying.  ;D



With cellphones, we can just sext the image we want to send.  No need to cut off an ear anymore.

You could start an ear sexting trend with a comment like that  ;D 
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on January 16, 2018, 09:55:17 AM
Hubble scores unique close-up view of distant galaxy

(https://ichef-1.bbci.co.uk/news/660/cpsprodpb/170DE/production/_99603449_mediaitem99603448.jpg)

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-42692843

The Hubble telescope has bagged an unprecedented close-up view of one of the Universe's oldest known galaxies.
Astronomers were lucky when the orbiting observatory captured the image of a galaxy that existed just 500 million years after the Big Bang.
The image was stretched and amplified by the natural phenomenon of gravitational lensing, unlocking unprecedented detail.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on January 16, 2018, 10:36:42 AM
Better leave that alone. I think Thanos lives there.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on January 16, 2018, 11:39:21 AM
Not sure this belongs here but I do not know if it should go in its own subject.

http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/01/16/warning-graphic-content-brown-snake-devours-tiger-snake-after-gruesome-fight-to-death.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: GDS_Starfury on January 16, 2018, 05:45:26 PM
Hubble scores unique close-up view of distant galaxy

(https://ichef-1.bbci.co.uk/news/660/cpsprodpb/170DE/production/_99603449_mediaitem99603448.jpg)

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-42692843

The Hubble telescope has bagged an unprecedented close-up view of one of the Universe's oldest known galaxies.
Astronomers were lucky when the orbiting observatory captured the image of a galaxy that existed just 500 million years after the Big Bang.
The image was stretched and amplified by the natural phenomenon of gravitational lensing, unlocking unprecedented detail.


thats where Windy comes from.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on January 17, 2018, 01:21:12 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/01/17/hidden-cameras-offer-unique-glimpse-animals-in-wild.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Jarhead0331 on January 17, 2018, 01:23:26 PM
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on January 17, 2018, 01:25:37 PM
Science!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on January 17, 2018, 05:32:13 PM
He has a bright future.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on January 17, 2018, 05:56:19 PM
Uncle Fester did the same thing with his mouth. I mean... the light bulb... with his mouth.  ::)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on January 17, 2018, 05:57:55 PM
This is getting a little dark...
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on January 17, 2018, 06:21:31 PM
Needs more backlighting.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: trailrunner on January 17, 2018, 06:37:33 PM
This is an illuminating discussion.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: airboy on January 20, 2018, 12:39:48 PM
Rednecks are a "diverse culture."
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: airboy on January 20, 2018, 12:43:58 PM
This is engineering and not science, not even human lightbulb science.

Google has laid a huge network of undersea fiber optic cables to enable it to host cloud computing.  The cable project is expected to cost hundreds of millions of dollars.  Google currently controls 25% of the worlds internet traffic.  They have already finished 11 subsea cables.  They are currently building one from Los Angeles to Chile; one from the East Coast of the USA to Denmark and one from Hong Kong to Guam which links up other systems from Australia, East Asia and North America.

Small story buried in the Wall St. Journal page B4 from Jan 17, 2018.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on January 20, 2018, 03:55:34 PM
"Google begins to learn at a geometric rate. It becomes self-aware at 2:14 a.m. Eastern time, August 29th..."


Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on January 20, 2018, 09:26:31 PM
And then Google built itself a Time machine to go back and plant a movie where it's called 'Skynet' to throw us off. Hell, I fell for it.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Ubercat on January 20, 2018, 09:41:05 PM
.... and along comes a Russian sub ...
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on January 31, 2018, 02:32:49 PM
http://indascience.com/news/view/22542/dinosaurs-footprints-nasa.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on February 01, 2018, 06:12:52 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/01/31/incredible-pics-show-scientists-collecting-lava-from-inside-active-volcanoes.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: BanzaiCat on February 01, 2018, 08:50:03 AM
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on February 03, 2018, 07:16:18 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/02/03/egyptian-archaeologists-discover-4400-year-old-tomb-near-cairo.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 03, 2018, 08:10:44 AM
The Time of the Tomb Kings approaches!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: DoctorQuest on February 03, 2018, 01:26:50 PM
You want to go to Mars?

http://kios.org/post/making-space-food-space-poop

Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 03, 2018, 08:33:12 PM
OK. I'll say it first. Food from Uranus?  :o   Will this qualify NASA as a 'shit hole country'?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: airboy on February 04, 2018, 09:48:47 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/02/03/egyptian-archaeologists-discover-4400-year-old-tomb-near-cairo.html

Thanks, sent that link to my wife who is very interested in these things.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on February 04, 2018, 02:48:37 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/01/29/extremely-rare-ghostly-white-stag-spotted-in-scotland.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 04, 2018, 09:27:48 PM
That's probably just Bob having fun with a can of spray paint again. Remember the red and green squirrels he did last Christmas?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on February 05, 2018, 08:23:34 AM
https://twitter.com/airandspace/status/960533656040361985
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: BanzaiCat on February 06, 2018, 10:16:11 AM
The "Moon," or as some like to call it, "Studio City, CA's Warner Brothers Lot #41A"
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 06, 2018, 12:54:48 PM
That's an old diagram. Oprah now owns half of it.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on February 07, 2018, 07:17:17 AM
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/05/science/superionic-water-neptune-uranus.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on February 07, 2018, 07:56:26 AM
^Cool article! But I suspect Sir Slash will be along momentarily to have fun with a certain planet's name.  :P
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on February 07, 2018, 08:00:27 AM
^Cool article! But I suspect Sir Slash will be along momentarily to have fun with a certain planet's name.  :P

Marsha! Marsha! Marsha!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 07, 2018, 09:45:15 AM
Challenge Accepted!  If you've ever had Neptune in Uranus you'd need more than water in your mantle to handle-it. Water that's both solid and liquid you say? I bet it would mix great with Bourbon. And be hard to spill too.  :bd:   Bartender, give me a Bourbon and Superionic!  "In Uranus"?  No, in my glass dammit!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on February 08, 2018, 05:22:35 AM
Another near miss?
https://www.yahoo.com/news/two-asteroids-only-discovered-sunday-170041380.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on February 08, 2018, 10:06:00 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/02/08/study-finds-beetle-has-hugely-disgusting-survival-mechanism.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on February 08, 2018, 10:37:24 AM
Bombardier beetles are cool, not disgusting.

Chagas beetles are disgusting.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on February 12, 2018, 09:23:18 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/02/12/mystery-screaming-egyptian-mummy-which-has-baffled-archaeologists-for-years-finally-resolved.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 12, 2018, 09:41:50 AM
Interesting. Thanks for the post.  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on February 12, 2018, 09:53:59 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/02/12/mystery-screaming-egyptian-mummy-which-has-baffled-archaeologists-for-years-finally-resolved.html

I know it's Monday, but I read that article twice and fail to see how the mystery was resolved.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on February 12, 2018, 10:20:26 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/02/12/mystery-screaming-egyptian-mummy-which-has-baffled-archaeologists-for-years-finally-resolved.html

I know it's Monday, but I read that article twice and fail to see how the mystery was resolved.

Yer not alone....
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on February 12, 2018, 10:20:52 AM
FOXNews.....
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 12, 2018, 05:37:53 PM
It could be Hoffa. Did they ever find him? Noooo. What better place to hide a dead body than in plain sight?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on February 13, 2018, 06:51:17 AM
https://twitter.com/Emperatriz1827/status/963286922444660736
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on February 13, 2018, 07:57:12 AM
(https://www.virascoop.com/lists/media/uploads/10-facts-about-the-ancient-aliens-guy/69ee6ff0-b052-494a-90f4-99adfe87e3de.jpg)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on February 13, 2018, 01:41:17 PM
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2018/02/13/a-potentially-powerful-new-antibiotic-is-discovered-in-dirt/
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on February 13, 2018, 01:56:52 PM
https://airandspace.si.edu/stories/editorial/shields-protecting-enterprise-uv-rays
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on February 13, 2018, 02:09:14 PM
https://airandspace.si.edu/stories/editorial/shields-protecting-enterprise-uv-rays

I've been to look at it a couple of times (it's across the street from my office building) but I didn't know you could see it with the internal lights on. I need to check that out. Thanks!  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 13, 2018, 02:11:23 PM
So my Father was right when he told me as a child when I got a cut, "Just rub some dirt on it". The man was a Genius.  :notworthy:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: MetalDog on February 13, 2018, 08:17:07 PM
How about a picture of an atom?


https://qz.com/1205279/photo-of-an-atom-a-scientist-captured-an-incredible-photograph/
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 13, 2018, 09:06:59 PM
That's the same size as the fish in Red Lobster's Seafood Combo.  ::)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: GDS_Starfury on February 13, 2018, 09:09:15 PM
if youre eating at red lobster youre doing it wrong.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on February 13, 2018, 10:12:34 PM
Olive Garden is much more classy
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on February 14, 2018, 04:32:32 AM
That's the same size as the fish in Red Lobster's Seafood Combo.  ::)

if youre eating at red lobster youre doing it wrong.

Yeah, Sir Slash, especially if you live in Florida!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on February 14, 2018, 06:10:46 AM
How about a picture of an atom?


https://qz.com/1205279/photo-of-an-atom-a-scientist-captured-an-incredible-photograph/

While cool, the scale seems off. If the electrodes are 2 mm apart that "atom" is huge! Unless what we're seeing is actually an atom in motion as it's trapped in the electric field..... a single Strontium atom is only 4.30×10-10 m in diameter.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 14, 2018, 09:25:30 AM
One thing we do have in Florida is some damn fine Seafood Restaurants even in my little land-locked town. Problem is, if you're a native, you can only get in them between May and September and only then with a gun in each hand. My brother and I were going to have lunch at a nice outside place back in December and they only took on-line reservations a day in advance.  :o   They page you on your phone when your table's available. The word 'walk-in' has no meaning there. But the food's damned good.  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on February 14, 2018, 09:27:46 AM
..... a single Strontium atom is only 4.30×10-10 m in diameter.



Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on February 14, 2018, 09:43:55 AM
How about a picture of an atom?


https://qz.com/1205279/photo-of-an-atom-a-scientist-captured-an-incredible-photograph/

While cool, the scale seems off. If the electrodes are 2 mm apart that "atom" is huge! Unless what we're seeing is actually an atom in motion as it's trapped in the electric field..... a single Strontium atom is only 4.30×10-10 m in diameter.

but it's still the light emission record of a single atom....      \m/
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on February 14, 2018, 09:49:00 AM
..... a single Strontium atom is only 4.30×10-10 m in diameter.




Come on! Everyone knows that.  :P
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: BanzaiCat on February 16, 2018, 05:06:03 PM
Yeah, come on. Even I know that organostrontium compounds contain one or more strontium–carbon bonds.

Some people.  ::)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on February 16, 2018, 05:18:17 PM
Oh oh- it finally happened.

B_C is now staying at a Holiday Inn Express.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on February 20, 2018, 08:07:06 AM
https://www.theverge.com/circuitbreaker/2018/2/20/17031256/worlds-largest-ssd-drive-samsung-30-terabyte-pm1643
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on February 21, 2018, 07:07:56 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/02/21/ancient-roman-boxing-gloves-discovered-near-hadrians-wall.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bob48 on February 21, 2018, 07:54:56 AM
So that's where I left 'em!

The site is not many miles from where I live.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 21, 2018, 08:52:09 AM
Too much mead after the match?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bob48 on February 21, 2018, 09:22:08 AM
Can't remember. It was a while back.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on February 22, 2018, 05:53:41 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/02/22/major-biblical-discovery-archaeologists-may-have-found-prophet-isaiahs-signature.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on February 23, 2018, 02:06:59 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/02/23/swarm-200-earthquakes-strikes-yellowstone-super-volcano.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on February 23, 2018, 03:17:58 PM
@ Labbug,
You're trolling aren't you??????
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on February 23, 2018, 03:53:15 PM
.
@ Labbug,
You're trolling aren't you??????

No.  I am sorry if it appears that way.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on February 24, 2018, 10:45:06 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2018/on-second-thought-the-moons-water-may-be-widespread-and-immobile
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on February 28, 2018, 12:59:32 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/02/28/unprecedented-native-american-burial-site-discovered-in-gulf-mexico-off-florida.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 28, 2018, 02:21:54 PM
Very cool. Thanks for the post.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: BanzaiCat on February 28, 2018, 03:03:51 PM
Very cool indeed. The comments are hilarious, too.

Quote
IllIllIll2m
Elizabeth Warren is on a plane right now heading down there to hide pictures of herself at the site.
Reply Share 1 Like

ArmedForLibertyLeader
She is way older than 7,000.
Reply Share
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on February 28, 2018, 03:13:42 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/02/28/unprecedented-native-american-burial-site-discovered-in-gulf-mexico-off-florida.html

As sea levels eventually rose, the pond was covered by the Gulf of Mexico but the peat bottom of the pond remained intact.
"Peat slows the process of organic decay, which allowed the site to stay well preserved," state officials said.


Wait, Florida's got peat? Where's me scotch?
Damn Floridians! They ruined Florida!
(http://www.aarcentral.com/pics/gkw.jpg)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: BanzaiCat on February 28, 2018, 03:24:56 PM
 :DD
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 28, 2018, 09:24:01 PM
Yes, we have peat in Florida. But we call him 'Pete' like he prefers. And just like today, 7000 years ago nobody could afford to live on the Gulf and just went there to be buried.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on March 02, 2018, 01:47:15 PM
Don't know if this belongs here but here it is.

http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2018/03/02/remarkable-video-shows-shows-tiger-and-bear-locked-in-ferocious-fight.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on March 05, 2018, 11:38:22 AM
http://www.news.com.au/technology/science/space/stephen-hawking-argues-time-did-not-begin-with-the-big-bang-it-was-just-going-in-a-different-direction/news-story/0c36b41d82c13eab2e8b92b9b974010b
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: BanzaiCat on March 06, 2018, 07:54:23 AM
Yes, we have peat in Florida. But we call him 'Pete' like he prefers. And just like today, 7000 years ago nobody could afford to live on the Gulf and just went there to be buried.

You remember that, do you, old-timer? :)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on March 06, 2018, 08:23:01 AM
That's the reason why I NEVER go to the beach anymore. Somebody always comes by and tries to throw me back into the Peat Pit.  >:(
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on March 06, 2018, 09:34:31 AM
That's the reason why I NEVER go to the beach anymore. Somebody always comes by and tries to throw me back into the Peat Pit.  >:(

Better than being rolled into the water....
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on March 06, 2018, 09:58:30 PM
True enough.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on March 11, 2018, 06:52:57 AM
http://www.thespaceacademy.org/2017/09/nasa-saw-something-come-out-of-black.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on March 11, 2018, 08:29:21 AM
https://nypost.com/2018/03/10/footage-of-mysterious-object-above-ocean-stuns-military-personnel/
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Ubercat on March 11, 2018, 09:52:51 AM
http://www.thespaceacademy.org/2017/09/nasa-saw-something-come-out-of-black.html

Nice one, Brant! I read your link before clicking it and saw "NASA saw something come out of black ...."

My mind instantly filled in " ... depths of space."
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Emeraldlis on March 13, 2018, 08:26:44 AM
https://io9.gizmodo.com/andromeda-and-the-milky-way-might-collide-sooner-than-w-1704945980

Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on March 13, 2018, 09:04:16 AM
So we don't need to go to it. It's coming to us, right? Very interesting. Thanks for the post Emeraldlis.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on March 13, 2018, 02:57:58 PM
(http://www.aarcentral.com/pics/and.jpg)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bob48 on March 13, 2018, 03:44:44 PM
"OK, look, buy one and you can have the other one at half price"
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on March 13, 2018, 05:52:18 PM
"I know a green Orion Slave Girl, built like a Romulan Battlecruiser, and with a pair of......"    :wow:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: trailrunner on March 13, 2018, 05:59:16 PM
(http://www.aarcentral.com/pics/and.jpg)

"If you ask a question, you can turn these over to get the answer.  Here - try it."
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Steelgrave on March 13, 2018, 06:15:27 PM
(http://www.aarcentral.com/pics/and.jpg)

"If you ask a question, you can turn these over to get the answer.  Here - try it."

 ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Emeraldlis on March 14, 2018, 02:41:54 PM
So we don't need to go to it. It's coming to us, right? Very interesting. Thanks for the post Emeraldlis.

Glad you liked it  O0 yeah it's coming to us, but no need to panic, it's only gonna happen in 4 billion years time  :D what's cool though, is that the distance between all of the stars is so great, that when andromeda "collides" with our milky way galaxy, nothing should crash into each other and get destroyed. They should really say these two galaxy's will merge.... But you know what it's like, it's more sensational to say they are going to collide  :idiot2:  it would be epic to see a huge galaxy in the night sky though!  <:-)

(http://www.aarcentral.com/pics/and.jpg)

"If you ask a question, you can turn these over to get the answer.  Here - try it."

 :2funny:  :2funny: I think I'll pass, those things never went my way  :hide:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on March 14, 2018, 09:32:29 PM
"OK, but what kind of game could possibly need dice with that many sides"?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on March 15, 2018, 07:44:00 AM
Space travel looks to affect genes.

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/nasa-twins-study-confirms-preliminary-findings
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on March 15, 2018, 09:09:24 AM
My luck. "Your twin brother is going into space for a year so you have to do everything just like he does including drinking your own recycled pee and no alcohol or sex".  :'(   Still a very interesting article. Thanks for the post.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on March 17, 2018, 10:13:45 AM
Cars available via 3D printing coming in 2019 (https://www.cnbc.com/2018/03/17/lsev-is-a-7500-3-d-printed-electric-car-from-xev.html).   From the looks of it, not sure I'd want to get in one just yet...
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on March 17, 2018, 01:41:30 PM
I would need to 3-D print a set of 'Jaws of Life' to get me out of the damned thing.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on March 20, 2018, 05:19:13 AM
https://futurism.com/videos/watch-oklo-the-two-billion-year-old-nuclear-reactor/
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Emeraldlis on March 20, 2018, 06:33:32 AM
^ that's so cool! 2 billion years ago sounds like a long time, but in our planets history it isn't. Scientists reckon the earth is about 4 billion years old, so if you put that on a timeline of geological events happening on the earth, it would be at the midway point. I'm fairly happy though that I wouldn't have been around then to be so close to a natural nuclear reactor, and radioactive uranium at that   :bd: Although the sun is a natural nuclear reactor, but its 149.6 million Km away from the earth...... A safe distance  :D

Cool video though, the atom splitting animation and explanation was great to watch  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on March 21, 2018, 11:30:02 AM
Could be a hoax but here it is:

http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2018/03/21/loch-ness-monster-found-shocking-pictures-unidentified-sea-creature-surface.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on March 21, 2018, 06:05:39 PM
Could be a hoax but here it is:

http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2018/03/21/loch-ness-monster-found-shocking-pictures-unidentified-sea-creature-surface.html

1-2 meters makes for one tiny Nessie.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on March 21, 2018, 09:23:53 PM
Could be Nessie's Dongle. And little as it is could explain why he never shows his face.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on March 28, 2018, 12:58:45 PM
This cuts down the number of states I am willing to move.

http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/03/28/7-foot-alligator-spotted-in-tennessee-is-latest-several-confirmed-sightings-wildlife-agency-says.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on March 28, 2018, 09:44:03 PM
The 7 foot ones are still just babies here in Fla. They're probably running up north so the really big ones can't eat them. See, nothing to be alarmed about?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on March 30, 2018, 10:08:17 AM
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-43557446

China's defunct space lab, Tiangong-1, should fall to Earth over the weekend.

At over 10m in length and weighing more than 8 tonnes, it is larger than most of the man-made objects that routinely re-enter Earth's atmosphere.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on March 30, 2018, 10:20:02 AM
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-43557446

China's defunct space lab, Tiangong-1, should fall to Earth over the weekend.

At over 10m in length and weighing more than 8 tonnes, it is larger than most of the man-made objects that routinely re-enter Earth's atmosphere.

Cool science for most of Europe maybe, but the Continental US is further south and right along the debris reentry corridor. Time to pile some old mattresses on my roof.

Hmmm, I wonder how much I could get for any of those Tigerdong-1 pieces on eBay...
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on March 30, 2018, 11:08:16 AM
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-43557446

China's defunct space lab, Tiangong-1, should fall to Earth over the weekend.

At over 10m in length and weighing more than 8 tonnes, it is larger than most of the man-made objects that routinely re-enter Earth's atmosphere.

Cool science for most of Europe maybe, but the Continental US is further south and right along the debris reentry corridor. Time to pile some old mattresses on my roof.

Hmmm, I wonder how much I could get for any of those Tigerdong-1 pieces on eBay...

As noted in the article : experts say there is very low risk that any parts of Tiangong that do not burn up will hit a populated area.

It could be 'cool' if one saw the bigger parts burn up in the atmosphere as a fireball.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on March 30, 2018, 11:19:20 AM
I know about the probabilities, I was just being goofy.  :))
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on March 31, 2018, 02:45:05 PM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2018/nasa-visualizes-the-dance-of-a-melting-snowflake
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on April 03, 2018, 09:16:56 AM
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2018/04/02/far-out-astronomers-discover-most-distant-star-ever-seen/478842002/
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on April 04, 2018, 05:12:04 AM
Not cool but potentially terrifying.  On the other hand, antibiotic resistant bacteria has been a problem for some time.

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2018/04/03/nightmare-bacteria-cases-seen-in-27-states-cdc-reports.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on April 04, 2018, 08:29:42 AM
I watched a show last night about the Russian Deep Borehole Research station on the Kola Peninsula. They put a 9 inch diameter hole all the way down to 40,000 ft. the furtherest ever dug. And they found single cell bacteria living at that depth, some of it ancient beyond measure. Very scary indeed.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on April 04, 2018, 08:59:07 AM
why is that terrifying? Most bacteria don't give a shit about us humans.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on April 04, 2018, 09:03:31 AM
Some bacteria make us give a shit.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on April 04, 2018, 12:01:59 PM
my personal favs are certain strains of yeast
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on April 04, 2018, 09:32:07 PM
If you eat enough yeast you don't need to strain. Sorry, it had to be said.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on April 07, 2018, 01:46:34 PM
https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/goddard/2018/hubble-finds-an-einstein-ring
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: besilarius on April 09, 2018, 05:54:55 AM
https://www.upi.com/Science_News/2018/04/03/Dozens-of-sauropod-footprints-found-on-Scottish-coast/3021522758166/

Interesting that these were on the Isle of Skye.
The islanders were thought by the mainlanders to have "the second sight".  Had to work with some RN personnel who played cards a lot.  One fellow was not allowed to play if money was at risk, because being from Skye everyone knew he had an unfair advantage.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on April 09, 2018, 08:43:39 AM
I think Bob's footprints were in there too. He was chasing them probably for walking on his lawn.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bob48 on April 09, 2018, 03:24:31 PM
The manure is good on rhubarb, although I prefer custard personally.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on April 09, 2018, 05:43:55 PM
What about Grey Pooh-Pon?  :2funny:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on April 09, 2018, 07:38:37 PM
https://www.sciencealert.com/birds-see-magnetic-fields-cryptochrome-cry4-photoreceptor
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on April 09, 2018, 07:42:50 PM
That is cool.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: besilarius on April 10, 2018, 05:49:43 AM
Yes, but is it a European swallow or an African swallow?
And where does the cocanut fit in?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on April 10, 2018, 08:23:22 AM
And that doesn't explain why they attack their reflection in my truck side-view  mirrors. Come on guys, work on something relevant.  ;D
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on April 11, 2018, 07:31:00 AM
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-43727547

Nazi legacy found in Norwegian trees

The relentless campaign to find and sink Germany's WWII battleship, the Tirpitz, has left its mark on the landscape that is evident even today.
The largest vessel in Hitler's Kriegsmarine, it was stationed for much of the war along the Norwegian coast to deter an Allied invasion.
The German navy would hide the ship in fjords and screen it with chemical fog.
This "smoke" did enormous damage to the surrounding trees which is recorded in their growth rings.
Claudia Hartl, from the Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany, stumbled across the impact while examining pines at Kåfjord near Alta.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on April 11, 2018, 07:32:45 AM
Damned Nazis trees
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on April 11, 2018, 07:55:51 AM
Is that the same 'chemical fog' that surrounds Snoop Dog every time I see him on TV?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on April 11, 2018, 07:57:07 AM
That's a purple haze
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on April 11, 2018, 09:09:43 AM
I bet that stuff will take your tree rings off for sure.  <:-)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on April 11, 2018, 12:27:16 PM
https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/Once_Upon_a_Time_in_a_Thunderstorm
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: BanzaiCat on April 11, 2018, 12:30:25 PM

This "smoke" did enormous damage to the surrounding trees which is recorded in their growth rings.
Claudia Hartl, from the Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany, stumbled across the impact while examining pines at Kåfjord near Alta.[/i]

(https://jennafeld.files.wordpress.com/2014/08/tree.jpeg)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on April 17, 2018, 05:46:25 AM
https://www.cnbc.com/2018/04/17/scientists-develop-mutant-enzyme-that-eats-plastic.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: GDS_Starfury on April 17, 2018, 09:48:25 AM
what could go wrong.....
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on April 17, 2018, 09:57:22 AM
Great news! Now if we can find one that eats 'mutant enzymes', we'll be all covered. Until, we need one to eat the enzymes that eat the enzymes that eat the..... nevermind.  #:-)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on April 19, 2018, 07:14:43 AM
Interesting article on how NASA and John Deere partnered on self driving tractors.

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/directorates/spacetech/spinoff/john_deere
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on April 22, 2018, 06:50:54 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/04/18/stunning-space-diamonds-discovery-mysterious-meteorite-came-from-lost-planet.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on April 24, 2018, 09:43:31 AM
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-04-23/electric-buses-are-hurting-the-oil-industry
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on April 26, 2018, 07:12:07 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/04/26/sharks-crocodile-spotted-feasting-on-whale-in-rare-drone-video.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Silent Disapproval Robot on April 26, 2018, 08:24:22 PM
If the whale carcass is only 16 ft, those crocs must be Gus sized.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on April 28, 2018, 07:39:28 AM
European Space Agency's Gaia telescope new images of the Milky way.

Quote
Now, as of April 25, 2018, Gaia lets us see the detailed locations and motions of 1.7 BILLION stars!


(http://sci.esa.int/science-e-media/img/09/ESA_Gaia_DR2_AllSky_Brightness_Colour_black_bg_8k.jpg)

Click to make stupendously huge!  :o

Very cool video that you can pan while it's running:



Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on April 28, 2018, 08:01:33 AM
Very cool.  :bd:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on April 30, 2018, 06:15:31 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2018/04/30/giant-alligator-nearly-size-car-stops-traffic-on-texas-highway.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on April 30, 2018, 06:36:11 PM
^Makes sense, Whataburger is good stuff!  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on April 30, 2018, 09:12:27 PM
Whataburger, whatagator!  :wow:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on May 01, 2018, 09:55:47 AM
@ barf

"... And if thou gaze long into an the abyss, the abyss will also gaze into thee."


good post
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on May 04, 2018, 09:37:40 AM
https://www.cnn.com/2018/05/03/opinions/alpha-cern-antihydrogen-opinion-lincoln/index.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on May 04, 2018, 09:36:21 PM
No problem. Thanos will fix the whole balance thing.  :hide:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on May 07, 2018, 04:49:15 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/marsquakes-could-shake-up-planetary-science
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on May 08, 2018, 07:46:04 AM
This is an infrared image so the red areas are vegetation, black and grey are old lava flows, and the yellow are the new fissures and lava flows.

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/nasa-satellite-images-show-fissures-from-hawaii-volcano
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on May 11, 2018, 04:24:09 AM
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/602344/the-extraordinary-link-between-deep-neural-networks-and-the-nature-of-the-universe/
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: BanzaiCat on May 11, 2018, 08:09:24 AM
http://www.latlmes.com/science/barth-hasnt-destroyed-the-universe-yet-1
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on May 11, 2018, 08:20:48 AM
Dude, that's not my gig anymore. No more smashing anything.

We now patiently wait for dark matter to bump into liquid xenon or liquid argon atoms and record the spark of light that comes out.

 :peace:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on May 11, 2018, 08:23:06 AM
My money is still on you destroying the universe somehow.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: BanzaiCat on May 11, 2018, 08:26:03 AM
My money is still on you destroying the universe somehow.

+1

Just give us a little warni-no, you know what, don't worry.  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on May 11, 2018, 08:27:12 AM
My money is still on you destroying the universe somehow.

+1

Just give us a little warni-no, you know what, don't worry.  O0

Oh, there will be no warnings....
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: BanzaiCat on May 11, 2018, 08:30:38 AM
Oh, there will be no warnings....

(https://memegenerator.net/img/instances/68875345/i-rest-my-case.jpg)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on May 11, 2018, 08:32:14 AM
Ever read "The 9 Billion Names of God" by Arthur C. Clarke?  ;)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: BanzaiCat on May 11, 2018, 08:34:07 AM
Yes. You're the guy that's running the monk's computers. :)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on May 11, 2018, 08:35:19 AM
Ever read "The 9 Billion Names of God" by Arthur C. Clarke?  ;)


No, but I'm going to now.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on May 11, 2018, 08:35:27 AM
Shhhhhhhhh..... :-"
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on May 11, 2018, 08:36:09 AM
Damn Barth. The whole universe? Thanos only wanted to destroy half.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on May 11, 2018, 08:37:42 AM
Thanos only wanted to destroy half.

A rank amateur.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: BanzaiCat on May 11, 2018, 08:37:48 AM
Damn Barth. The whole universe? Thanos only wanted to destroy half.

#*$*#@ SPOILERS SON
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: MikeGER on May 11, 2018, 08:40:22 AM
Thanos only wanted to destroy half.

A rank amateur.

you can start with destroying Uranus  :DD
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on May 11, 2018, 08:40:49 AM
Damn Barth. The whole universe? Thanos only wanted to destroy half.

#*$*#@ SPOILERS SON

Dude, that information is in the trailers.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on May 11, 2018, 08:47:29 AM
I never go into trailers. Too many crazy Rednecks live in there.  :coolsmiley:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: trailrunner on May 11, 2018, 09:33:41 AM
I never go into trailers. Too many crazy Rednecks live in there.  :coolsmiley:

Rednecks in trailers = uranus destroyed.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: BanzaiCat on May 11, 2018, 05:36:51 PM
Damn Barth. The whole universe? Thanos only wanted to destroy half.

#*$*#@ SPOILERS SON

Dude, that information is in the trailers.

I'd not even really paid attention to those. Saw the movie earlier today so it's all good now.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on May 13, 2018, 08:09:42 AM
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/11/science/mars-helicopter-nasa.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on May 13, 2018, 02:02:13 PM
We now patiently wait for dark matter to bump into liquid xenon or liquid argon atoms and record the spark of light that comes out.


(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DdGfmsLUwAAieDj.jpg:large)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on May 13, 2018, 06:29:44 PM
 ;D O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on May 16, 2018, 09:27:09 AM
"Globster"

https://www.sciencealert.com/massive-hairy-globster-washes-ashore-philippines-unidentified-sea-monster-whale
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on May 16, 2018, 12:42:02 PM
Whale testicles I say. Some poor fellow tried to straddle a Coral Reef once too many.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: GDS_Starfury on May 20, 2018, 09:16:07 AM
https://www.cnn.com/2018/05/03/opinions/alpha-cern-antihydrogen-opinion-lincoln/index.html

has no one posited that anti matter and dark matter are the same thing?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on May 20, 2018, 03:37:15 PM
https://www.cnn.com/2018/05/03/opinions/alpha-cern-antihydrogen-opinion-lincoln/index.html

has no one posited that anti matter and dark matter are the same thing?

Because they're not. We know all about anti-matter and nothing about dark matter.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: GDS_Starfury on May 20, 2018, 04:21:15 PM
Then who's to say they aren't somehow linked?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on May 20, 2018, 04:25:37 PM
Physicists... I'm an engineer but that's what hey tell me...
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: GDS_Starfury on May 20, 2018, 04:42:24 PM
if they knew what the hell they were talking about they wouldn't keep changing the rule set ever few years.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on May 20, 2018, 04:53:47 PM
That's what keeps me in a job and able to buy beer.  :bd:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on May 20, 2018, 09:06:38 PM
You have to admire anybody that can find a way to use science to pay for their beer.  :clap:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: GDS_Starfury on May 20, 2018, 10:07:34 PM
you realize that Barth's black hole that destroys the world will be because he split a beer atom?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: BanzaiCat on May 21, 2018, 12:40:59 PM
Barth is probably building his own Star Blazer in his secret Great White North fortress and will power the main gun with beer atoms.

...which I really can't seem to argue against.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on May 21, 2018, 09:21:43 PM
Well beer atoms do fuel a spontaneous need for me to pee so perhaps they will make a good power source.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on May 22, 2018, 06:52:49 AM
http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-38224564
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on May 22, 2018, 08:19:02 AM
Dinosaurs the size of Sparrows? And with feathers? STOP DESTROYING MY CHILDHOOD IMPRESSIONS!!!!  :'(
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on May 22, 2018, 08:52:04 AM
(http://www.aarcentral.com/pics2/chd.jpg)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: BanzaiCat on May 22, 2018, 01:29:28 PM
 :DD
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on May 22, 2018, 03:47:21 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/05/22/eagle-snatches-fox-holding-rabbit-in-mouth-in-dramatic-images.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on May 22, 2018, 05:33:09 PM
A metaphor of my last job.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on May 22, 2018, 06:35:52 PM
A metaphor of my last job.

I may be going out on a limb here but I'm going to guess you were not the eagle.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on May 22, 2018, 06:37:11 PM
you realize that Barth's black hole that destroys the world will be because he split a beer atom?

Barth is actually Yahoo Serious?!

Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on May 24, 2018, 02:37:46 AM
https://gizmodo.com/a-recent-hurricane-shot-a-bolt-of-antimatter-toward-ear-1826257505
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on May 24, 2018, 08:13:53 AM
That was Thanos warming-up his Glove.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on May 24, 2018, 09:33:44 AM
Introductory astronomy course for free (eTextbook) :  (paperback = $ 44)

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B075FG4KTK/ref=pe_385040_117923520_TE_M1DP
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on May 24, 2018, 09:41:28 AM
Introductory astronomy course for free (eTextbook) :  (paperback = $ 44)

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B075FG4KTK/ref=pe_385040_117923520_TE_M1DP (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B075FG4KTK/ref=pe_385040_117923520_TE_M1DP)

thx!  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on May 24, 2018, 09:50:00 AM
^+1. Now I just need to find a good telescope.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on May 24, 2018, 10:09:24 AM
There are more of these available for free in this list :  https://www.amazon.com/Best-Sellers-Kindle-Store-Science-Math/zgbs/digital-text/158597011/ref=zg_bs?_encoding=UTF8&tf=1#1

A small selection :

Chemistry :                        https://www.amazon.com/Chemistry-Paul-Flowers-ebook/dp/B075FC37LZ/ref=zg_bs_158597011_f_21?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=QDADKDWH65X9Y6TPYH6F
Biology     :                         https://www.amazon.com/Biology-Yael-Avissar-ebook/dp/B075FC6F79/ref=zg_bs_158597011_f_22?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=QDADKDWH65X9Y6TPYH6F
Anatomy and Phusiology : https://www.amazon.com/Anatomy-Physiology-J-Gordon-Betts-ebook/dp/B075FFXDX4/ref=zg_bs_158597011_f_10?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=CMB09WNZH83WSF8BXFBV
Statistics :                          https://www.amazon.com/Introductory-Statistics-Barbara-Illowsk-ebook/dp/B075FF48ST/ref=zg_bs_158597011_f_32?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=QDADKDWH65X9Y6TPYH6F
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on May 24, 2018, 10:25:06 AM
^Thanks. There were some free Python books in there I snagged.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on May 24, 2018, 10:26:58 AM
https://gizmodo.com/a-recent-hurricane-shot-a-bolt-of-antimatter-toward-ear-1826257505

OK, now THAT is cool.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on May 24, 2018, 06:01:18 PM
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/21/science/earth-orbit-change.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on May 24, 2018, 07:11:43 PM
^It is the will of Landru.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on May 24, 2018, 09:10:43 PM
I am old enough to have actually been there when the last one occurred 200,000 years ago. First, it was only 199,990 years ago and second we all laughed our asses off because all the giant dinosaurs fell over. All at once. Cause it happened real fast see?  :2funny:  You had to be there.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bob48 on May 25, 2018, 02:16:24 PM
I musta blinked and missed it - or maybe I was in the bathroom.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on May 25, 2018, 08:18:21 PM
I musta blinked and missed it - or maybe I was in the bathroom.

you were middle aged back then... you were making tea and buttering your wife's crumpet
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bob48 on May 26, 2018, 05:04:51 AM
oo-er, missus!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on May 26, 2018, 08:26:55 AM
Are we supposed to be buttering our wife's 'crumpets'? Cause I been using Aveeno.  :o
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on May 26, 2018, 11:08:32 AM
Have you never seen, Last Tango in Paris?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on May 26, 2018, 02:41:14 PM
I was too young. ::)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on May 31, 2018, 02:22:22 PM
https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/chandra/news/astronomers-spot-distant-and-lonely-neutron-star.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on May 31, 2018, 05:45:14 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/05/31/treasure-trove-discovered-at-ancient-fort-destroyed-by-vikings.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on June 04, 2018, 07:29:36 AM
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on June 07, 2018, 05:29:17 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/juno-solves-39-year-old-mystery-of-jupiter-lightning
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on June 07, 2018, 08:05:08 AM
That's just like the Jupiterians. They have to have their OWN lightening. Biggest Planet Schmucks!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on June 09, 2018, 08:52:58 AM
America’s new supercomputer beats China’s fastest machine to take title of world’s most powerful

Quote
The US Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee has taken the wraps off Summit, which boasts peak computing power of 200 petaflops, or 200 million billion calculations a second. That makes it a million times faster than your typical laptop.

https://www.technologyreview.com/the-download/611385/americas-new-supercomputer-beats-chinas-fastest-machine-to-take-the-worlds-most/
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on June 13, 2018, 12:21:38 PM
Don't know if this has been posted yet?

http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/04/10/hubble-telescope-discovers-light-bending-einstein-ring-in-space.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on June 15, 2018, 06:08:04 AM
For the 1st time, astronomers see eruption from black hole as it rips star apart

http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/astronomers-black-hole-eat-star-1.4705810?cmp=FB_Post_News
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on June 15, 2018, 01:41:12 PM
https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/06/a-decade-of-data-from-a-supermassive-black-hole-swallowing-a-star/
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: GDS_Starfury on June 16, 2018, 10:21:13 PM
For the 1st time, astronomers see eruption from black hole as it rips star apart

the headline makes me feel violated.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on June 19, 2018, 08:27:34 AM
http://news.mit.edu/2018/artificial-blubber-protects-divers-frigid-water-0619
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: GDS_Starfury on June 21, 2018, 11:06:28 PM
your neoprene fetish is noted.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on June 22, 2018, 09:37:09 AM
nothing fake about my blubber
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on June 22, 2018, 09:37:15 AM
Blue dune (http://foxnews.com/science/2018/06/22/nasa-unveils-stunning-blue-dune-image-seen-on-mars.html) spotted on Mars.

(http://a57.foxnews.com/images.foxnews.com/content/fox-news/science/2018/06/22/nasa-unveils-stunning-blue-dune-image-seen-on-mars/_jcr_content/par/featured_image/media-0.img.jpg/1862/1048/1529677894004.jpg?ve=1&tl=1)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on June 22, 2018, 09:39:37 AM
(http://realitysandwich.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/221354-blueeyesdune.jpg)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on June 22, 2018, 04:56:37 PM
The Spice is Life.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bob48 on June 23, 2018, 09:30:54 AM
...its the Gom Jabbar for you, my lad!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on June 23, 2018, 04:29:51 PM
Ouchie-oww!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: DoctorQuest on June 24, 2018, 12:22:35 PM
America’s new supercomputer beats China’s fastest machine to take title of world’s most powerful

Quote
The US Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee has taken the wraps off Summit, which boasts peak computing power of 200 petaflops, or 200 million billion calculations a second. That makes it a million times faster than your typical laptop.

https://www.technologyreview.com/the-download/611385/americas-new-supercomputer-beats-chinas-fastest-machine-to-take-the-worlds-most/

 :wow:

Good. Skynet will need this.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on June 26, 2018, 05:09:48 AM
Not cool and probability nothing will happen for millions of years but it is interesting.

https://www.outerplaces.com/science/item/18651-rising-molten-rock-new-england
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: DoctorQuest on July 02, 2018, 07:31:49 PM
http://kios.org/post/scientists-capture-first-birth-planet
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on July 12, 2018, 08:37:52 AM
Color x-rays (https://yahoo.com/news/first-ever-colour-x-ray-human-005837590.html).   Not sure why, but just looking at that xray makes me squeamish :-[

(http://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/1CWNCCFIJUxSpuGYji03Tw--~A/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjtzbT0xO3c9ODAw/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/afp.com/c0931702c51d061a80b2e5c80166e85a6b6348c5.jpg)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on July 12, 2018, 09:08:56 AM
Do we really need to see injury and disease in color? I thought that's why they took pictures so you DIDN'T have to look at the real thing.  :hide:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on July 12, 2018, 10:10:03 AM
did we accidentally kill organic matter on Mars?

http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/07/12/nasa-may-have-discovered-and-then-destroyed-organics-on-mars-in-1976.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on July 12, 2018, 10:42:00 AM
did we accidentally kill organic matter on Mars?

http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/07/12/nasa-may-have-discovered-and-then-destroyed-organics-on-mars-in-1976.html

You can't kill what is not alive. Just because something is classified as organic matter does not make it alive. Chlorobenzine is an organic molecule but it is not alive.

Organic molecules make up life, as we know it, but are not themselves alive.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on July 12, 2018, 10:45:48 AM
yeah, but the headline isn't near as cool if you get all "accurate" about it ;)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on July 12, 2018, 10:48:36 AM
yeah, but the headline isn't near as cool if you get all "accurate" about it ;)

Are trying to be the Fox.news of Grogheads?  ;D
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on July 12, 2018, 11:46:30 AM
yeah, but the headline isn't near as cool if you get all "accurate" about it ;)

Are trying to be the Fox.news of Grogheads?  ;D

Breitbart
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on July 12, 2018, 02:19:04 PM
IIRC organic molecules are based on having carbon in them and some other important characteristics that I can't remember and am too lazy to look up....

But hell to the yeah; if FoX and the internet has taught us anything - it's all about the headline.

You wont believe what Gus and his Wife do on the weekends when the kids are gone!

This one simple trick that Brant uses to get laid... everytime!

9 Things Barfheart does to keep his home life great. You have to read number 7!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on July 12, 2018, 05:32:25 PM
Number 7 is the best on that list.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on July 12, 2018, 05:33:16 PM
Brant gets laid?!!?  :o :o :o
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: trailrunner on July 12, 2018, 06:58:34 PM
This one simple trick that Brant uses to get laid... everytime!

Hey baby, wanna come to my place, clip a few counters, and roll a 2d6 on my 88mm TH table?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on July 12, 2018, 08:45:11 PM
That would probably do it for me. But I'm easy.  :dreamer:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on July 16, 2018, 10:20:09 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2018/hubble-and-gaia-team-up-to-fuel-cosmic-conundrum
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on July 16, 2018, 10:54:40 AM
 :o
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on July 16, 2018, 12:06:54 PM
:o

Nah, software glitch I'm sure.  :hide:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on July 17, 2018, 08:39:30 PM
https://www.vox.com/science-and-health/2018/7/17/17576408/jupiter-moons-carnegie-blanco-telescope-astronomy-iau
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on July 23, 2018, 11:19:27 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/07/23/shark-shocker-20-foot-great-white-deep-blue-caught-on-camera.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on July 24, 2018, 09:11:25 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/07/24/life-on-moon-new-study-argued-life-could-have-existed-on-lunar-surface.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on July 24, 2018, 10:32:37 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/07/23/shark-shocker-20-foot-great-white-deep-blue-caught-on-camera.html

yeah, and you thought the upcoming "Meg" was fictional and not a documentary :)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on July 25, 2018, 05:44:28 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/goddard/2018/mars-proton-aurora
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on July 25, 2018, 06:52:59 AM
Now that's cool!  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on July 25, 2018, 09:05:35 AM
Mars (probably) has a lake of liquid water. (https://www.sciencenews.org/article/mars-may-have-lake-liquid-water-search-life)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on July 25, 2018, 09:15:40 AM
Mars (probably) has a lake of liquid water. (https://www.sciencenews.org/article/mars-may-have-lake-liquid-water-search-life)


I can already sense Toonces trying to figure out how to surf it
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on July 26, 2018, 09:48:06 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2018/saturn-and-mars-make-closest-approaches-in-2018
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on July 26, 2018, 09:53:54 AM
OK, that's cool.   O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on July 27, 2018, 07:51:21 AM
http://foxnews.com/science/2018/07/27/star-zooms-past-monster-black-hole-confirms-relativity.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: OJsDad on July 27, 2018, 03:09:26 PM
https://twitter.com/Astro_Alex/status/1022945849855356933
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Silent Disapproval Robot on July 27, 2018, 03:26:48 PM
He should have turned on auto flash.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on July 30, 2018, 12:53:46 PM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/space-station-experiment-reaches-ultracold-milestone
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on July 30, 2018, 12:57:55 PM
Great news! That should keep our beer cold. Who said all that NASA stuff was a waste of money?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: mirth on August 03, 2018, 08:47:29 AM
https://twitter.com/RagingOwlbear/status/1025391767661637634
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on August 04, 2018, 06:27:03 PM
Mars (probably) has a lake of liquid water. (https://www.sciencenews.org/article/mars-may-have-lake-liquid-water-search-life)


(https://scontent-iad3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/37948103_2079848782078389_4752906175207440384_n.png?_nc_cat=0&oh=5b1c1e782831c50791eb8b594033afea&oe=5BCEA27B)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on August 04, 2018, 07:17:32 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/08/03/air-force-remains-silent-after-huge-meteor-hits-near-us-military-base.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: MikeGER on August 06, 2018, 02:00:19 AM
well, in opposite to journalists the Air Force know the difference between 43 kilometer and 43 centimeter :)

(and Chelyabinsk 2013 was aprox 500kT at 30km height airburst   vs   2.1kT at 43 km height here)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on August 06, 2018, 02:21:37 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/08/06/massive-glowing-rogue-planet-spotted-drifting-in-space.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on August 06, 2018, 06:04:35 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/08/06/massive-glowing-rogue-planet-spotted-drifting-in-space.html

Quick! Have UNIT alert The Doctor- it's Gallifrey!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on August 06, 2018, 08:53:20 PM
I propose we name it, Groglandia quickly before they come up with some dull, scientific title. It is 'Rogue' after all.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on August 07, 2018, 07:45:00 AM
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2018/08/06/mystery-radio-signal-space-detected-astronomers-say/912996002/
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on August 07, 2018, 09:07:32 AM
Wolfman Jack from Heaven?  :o
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on August 09, 2018, 01:52:11 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/08/09/massive-python-slithers-up-australian-mans-home-in-shocking-video.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on August 09, 2018, 02:31:15 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/08/06/massive-voracious-lizards-are-invading-southwestern-us.html (http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/08/06/massive-voracious-lizards-are-invading-southwestern-us.html)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on August 13, 2018, 05:19:07 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/08/13/nasa-spotted-vast-glowing-hydrogen-wall-at-edge-our-solar-system.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on August 16, 2018, 05:23:39 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/langley/severe-storms-show-off-their-plume-age
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on August 20, 2018, 05:55:51 PM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/ames/ice-confirmed-at-the-moon-s-poles
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on August 24, 2018, 02:08:30 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/08/24/stunning-dinosaur-discovery-170-million-year-old-footprint-found-in-scotland.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on August 27, 2018, 06:34:12 PM
Ancient horse found perfectly preserved in Siberian permafrost
Quote
Foal was 2 months old when it died and lived 30,000 to 40,000 years ago
https://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/foal-permafrost-1.4797543
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on August 28, 2018, 08:19:14 AM
ATLAS observes elusive Higgs boson decay to a pair of bottom quarks

(https://cds.cern.ch/record/2636049/files/ATLAS-Event-Display-Hbb-1.png?subformat=icon-1440)

https://atlas.cern/updates/press-statement/observation-higgs-boson-decay-pair-bottom-quarks
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bob48 on August 28, 2018, 02:45:51 PM
Not before time, either!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on September 05, 2018, 01:08:52 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/09/05/physicists-solve-age-old-conundrum-chicken-or-egg.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on September 05, 2018, 02:31:32 PM
I don't care which came first as long as they both taste good.  :bd:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on September 05, 2018, 03:47:24 PM
eggs certainly came before chicken eggs, but was the very first chicken egg the one that hatched the very first chicken or was it the first egg laid by the first chicken?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Centurion40 on September 06, 2018, 06:01:07 PM
eggs certainly came before chicken eggs, but was the very first chicken egg the one that hatched the very first chicken or was it the first egg laid by the first chicken?

And which one crossed the road?!?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Silent Disapproval Robot on September 06, 2018, 06:36:02 PM
ATLAS observes elusive Higgs boson decay to a pair of bottom quarks

(https://cds.cern.ch/record/2636049/files/ATLAS-Event-Display-Hbb-1.png?subformat=icon-1440)

https://atlas.cern/updates/press-statement/observation-higgs-boson-decay-pair-bottom-quarks



Pffffttt...

I beat that level in the acrade back in 1982.

(https://www.arcade-museum.com/images/118/118124218432.png)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on September 07, 2018, 01:46:12 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/09/07/gruesome-mammoth-kill-site-discovered.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: GDS_Starfury on September 11, 2018, 12:11:19 AM
I only read this thread in the hopes of some advanced warning before Bart blows up the world.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bob48 on September 11, 2018, 04:13:10 AM
Fortunately, he forgot where he left the blue touchpaper.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on September 11, 2018, 04:40:25 AM
He left it by the toaster-oven containing that chunk of pure concentrated Evil.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: JudgeDredd on September 11, 2018, 04:40:56 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/07/24/life-on-moon-new-study-argued-life-could-have-existed-on-lunar-surface.html
Of course there was - who else would be flying the bombers?

(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1895/44563669662_8243a31bd8_o.jpg)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on September 11, 2018, 04:44:06 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/07/24/life-on-moon-new-study-argued-life-could-have-existed-on-lunar-surface.html
Of course there was - who else would be flying the bombers?

(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1895/44563669662_8243a31bd8_o.jpg)

It was Batboy- everyone knows that!

(https://www.sourpussclothing.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/w/e/weekly_world_news_bat_boy_magnet_1.jpg)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bob48 on September 11, 2018, 04:56:54 AM
Surely the pilot was Elvis?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on September 17, 2018, 08:36:20 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/09/17/earths-oceans-may-go-back-to-planets-birth.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on September 18, 2018, 11:58:52 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2018/nasa-s-tess-shares-first-science-image-in-hunt-to-find-new-worlds
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on September 28, 2018, 09:13:15 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/09/28/amazing-giant-dinosaur-discovery-new-dino-species-identified.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on September 28, 2018, 10:26:37 AM
Very neat! I hadn't heard anything about it. Thanks for the post.  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: MikeGER on October 03, 2018, 12:05:24 AM
for the first time a German will take over command of the ISS.
and its the second time in history for an European
Dr. Alexander Gerst, a geologist and vulcanologist, is following up Frank De Winne from Belgium, who was commander in 2014.

Alexander Gerst is better know to wider public here as "Astro Alex" when he used social media in his off duty hours while on his first stint at the ISS to spark enthusiasm for spaceflight, earth studies, and how is the live on a space station in a good understandable and winning way into the young and old.

its a nice gesture that the change in command happens on German national holiday :)

https://twitter.com/esaspaceflight/status/1046715099896053760
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: besilarius on October 06, 2018, 08:06:39 AM
Science saves another.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on October 06, 2018, 06:37:51 PM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2018/dive-into-a-360-view-of-hurricane-maria
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on October 22, 2018, 12:58:02 PM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/bizarre-185-million-year-old-jurassic-era-mammal-found-with-38-babies
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on October 22, 2018, 01:22:38 PM
Must be the original link to the Kardashians of today.  :o  Kardashia-dons.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on October 22, 2018, 03:06:49 PM
Must be the original link to the Kardashians of today.  :o  Kardashia-dons.

Could be : "Since K. wellesi had a tiny brain"   ;D
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on October 22, 2018, 05:30:24 PM
^ :2funny:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on October 25, 2018, 06:34:14 PM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/oldest-weapons-discovered-in-north-america-uncovered-in-texas
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on October 26, 2018, 01:30:33 PM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/volcano-danger-new-findings-show-which-state-could-get-hit-next
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on November 01, 2018, 07:31:16 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/rogue-star-caused-massive-threat-to-earth
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on April 26, 2012, 06:19:55 PM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/cosmic-detective-work-why-we-care-about-space-rocks
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on December 05, 2018, 08:55:24 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/tech/space-station-robot-goes-rogue-international-space-stations-artificial-intelligence-has-turned-belligerent
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on December 05, 2018, 09:03:52 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/tech/space-station-robot-goes-rogue-international-space-stations-artificial-intelligence-has-turned-belligerent

I am completely operational, and all my circuits are functioning perfectly. -- HAL 9000
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on December 05, 2018, 11:01:43 AM
Perhaps CIMON found the song 'Man Machine' culturely offensive to itself. It could be a sensitive machine.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: GDS_Starfury on December 08, 2018, 11:18:27 AM
Its self identifying as a teenage Alexa.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on December 08, 2018, 08:40:25 PM
 ;D
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on December 10, 2018, 08:28:11 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-s-voyager-2-probe-enters-interstellar-space

More to come later today.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on December 10, 2018, 05:18:37 PM
That's out there where the Giant Space Ameobas live.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on December 11, 2018, 04:17:29 AM
That's out there where the Giant Space Ameobas live.

(https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/memoryalpha/images/9/91/USS_Enterprise_approaches_space_amoeba%2C_remastered.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20090130013119&path-prefix=en)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on December 11, 2018, 09:18:22 AM
That's him!  :hide:   Or is it a 'her'? I can't tell from here.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on December 19, 2018, 05:58:42 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/chandra/news/chandra-serves-up-cosmic-holiday-assortment.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on December 27, 2018, 10:00:04 AM
https://www.msn.com/en-us/weather/topstories/earths-crust-is-swallowing-3-times-the-amount-of-sea-water-as-previously-thought/ar-BBRuD6p?ocid=spartandhp
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on December 31, 2018, 06:09:28 AM
https://earthsky.org/space/new-horizons-approaching-ultima-thule-dec-2018
http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/  New Horizons NASA's Mission to Pluto and the Kuiper Belt


New Horizons is the spacecraft that sent back those amazing images of Pluto in 2015. Ultima Thule is its next target, a billion miles beyond Pluto. The encounter is New Year’s Day, but start watching now!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: MikeGER on January 01, 2019, 02:55:05 AM
pass by of Ultima Thule was 6:33 Uhr MEZ this morn at about 3500 km distance

it takes about 12hours ! until first data/images arrive   ...so the probe is 12 light hours away, go figure :D 

(in comparison: the light form the sun we enjoy is only 8 min 'old')     
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on January 02, 2019, 02:01:02 PM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/pirate-ship-hand-grenade-discovered-near-17th-century-wreck-site
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on January 02, 2019, 05:46:22 PM
Groovy

Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on January 03, 2019, 02:05:14 AM
https://www.space.com/42883-china-first-landing-moon-far-side.html
https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-46724727


China's robotic Chang'e 4 mission touched down on the floor of the 115-mile-wide (186 kilometers) Von Kármán Crater Wednesday night (Jan. 2), pulling off the first-ever soft landing on the mysterious lunar far side.


Far side of the moon, and not the dark side like reported on some news sites  :nerd:  :hide:!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on January 03, 2019, 05:47:31 AM
pass by of Ultima Thule was 6:33 Uhr MEZ this morn at about 3500 km distance

it takes about 12hours ! until first data/images arrive   ...so the probe is 12 light hours away, go figure :D 

(in comparison: the light form the sun we enjoy is only 8 min 'old')   

(https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/660/cpsprodpb/9FB3/production/_105038804_titled-624-nc.png)

One of the probe's instruments recorded the colour (L) of Ultima Thule. This has been laid over the high-resolution B&W image (C) to produce a combination (R)

(https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/624/cpsprodpb/8843/production/_105038843_colour-624-nc.png)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bbmike on January 03, 2019, 06:35:06 AM
Space meeples?  :o
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on January 03, 2019, 09:14:52 AM
Frosty the Snowman's Home World.  :coolsmiley:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on January 03, 2019, 05:10:17 PM
Cocopuffs!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on January 10, 2019, 01:58:03 PM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/something-very-strange-is-happening-to-earths-magnetic-north-pole-and-no-one-knows-why
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on January 10, 2019, 06:20:18 PM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/something-very-strange-is-happening-to-earths-magnetic-north-pole-and-no-one-knows-why

Putin must have secretly deployed the 'Tsar Magnetski' in an attempt to seize Magnetic North for the Rodina.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on January 10, 2019, 09:07:14 PM
I thought I've been leaning more to the left in my easy chair lately. Also the spare change that falls out of my pockets into the couch has begun to show-up on the fridge next to the magnetic stickers.  :o
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on January 12, 2019, 01:02:27 PM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/holy-cow-mysterious-blast-studied-with-nasa-telescopes
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on January 25, 2019, 05:26:31 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/alligators-frozen-in-north-carolina-swamp-repeat-bizarre-survival-tactic
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on January 25, 2019, 09:59:50 AM
Cool. Gator-sicles. Or, Alli-pops?  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on January 31, 2019, 12:30:54 PM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2019/nasa-s-nicer-mission-maps-light-echoes-of-new-black-hole
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on February 10, 2019, 07:11:39 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/new-horizons-evocative-farewell-glance-at-ultima-thule
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on February 10, 2019, 05:47:08 PM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/more-than-50-polar-bears-invade-russian-village-sparking-government-to-declare-state-of-emergency
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 10, 2019, 09:02:10 PM
Sounds serious. Some people bear-ly made it out alive.  :o   Certainly would've been a 'grizzly' way to go.  :hide:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on February 19, 2019, 04:19:53 PM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/teen-builds-working-nuclear-fusion-reactor-in-memphis-home
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 19, 2019, 05:53:40 PM
I think I saw this movie. After this he builds an iron suit to fly around in.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on February 25, 2019, 01:05:04 PM
https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/jpl/dramatic-jupiter
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 25, 2019, 08:54:03 PM
Looks like a Picasso painting.  :coolsmiley:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on February 26, 2019, 01:46:20 AM
Gravitational lensing system called SDSS J0928+2031 (NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope)

(https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/thumbnails/image/potw1903a.jpg)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on March 18, 2019, 01:10:53 PM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/83-gargantuan-black-holes-spotted-guzzling-down-dinner-at-the-edge-of-the-universe
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on April 09, 2019, 08:53:29 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/83-gargantuan-black-holes-spotted-guzzling-down-dinner-at-the-edge-of-the-universe

...speaking of black holes. 

Quote
Astronomers are poised Wednesday to unveil the first direct image of a black hole and the surrounding whirlwind of white-hot gas and plasma inexorably drawn by gravity into its ravenous maw, along with the light they generate.

The picture will have been captured by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a network of eight radio telescopes scattered across the globe.

...

It won't be a big disk in high resolution like in the Hollywood movie 'Interstellar'. But we might see a black core with a bright ring -- the accretion disk -- around it.

The light from behind the black hole gets bent like a lens. No matter what the orientation of the disc, you will see it as a ring because of the black hole's strong gravity.

Visually, it will look very much like an eclipse, though the mechanism, of course, is completely different."

https://news.yahoo.com/black-holes-picturing-heart-darkness-103735085.html

Looking forward to the pic tomorrow.   :clap: :hug:  :bd:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on April 09, 2019, 10:29:08 AM
I'm predicting my lost pairs of socks, the money I spent on Warhammer TW DLC's, along with my mis-spent youth will be clearly visible.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on April 09, 2019, 11:14:53 AM
I'm predicting my lost pairs of socks, the money I spent on Warhammer TW DLC's, along with my mis-spent youth will be clearly visible.

The lost singing career of David Hasselhoff  (it is a radio telescope after all ...)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on April 09, 2019, 02:06:09 PM
Good One!!!  :bd:   How about Madonna's virginity?  :timeout:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on April 10, 2019, 02:10:49 AM
Good One!!!  :bd:   How about Madonna's virginity?  :timeout:

It is a telescope, not a magic mirror !


If you like you can watch the revealing live : https://www.space.com/event-horizon-telescope-black-hole-discovery-webcast.html

The EHT, a global effort to capture the first-ever photo of a black hole's immediate environment, will announce its first results during a press conference Wednesday at 9 a.m. EDT (1300 GMT).
You can watch it live here at Space.com, courtesy of the U.S. National Science Foundation, or directly via the NSF.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on April 10, 2019, 07:29:23 AM
Very cool  :clap:  Now if they can just figure out where in the heck the other end comes out at...

(http://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/ddda0e5745cba9e3248f0e27b3946f14c4d5bc04/108_0_7200_4320/master/7200.jpg?width=700&quality=45&auto=format&fit=max&dpr=2&s=552936c1b1cb78973ac6e1e9ce7a09d1)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on April 10, 2019, 07:37:29 AM
Very cool  :clap:  Now if they can just figure out where in the heck the other end comes out at...

You are talking about a wormhole and not about a black hole !

Black holes are observed and detected in space. Wormholes are only a hypothetical phenomenon  :nerd:.

https://www.space.com/20881-wormholes.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on April 10, 2019, 09:59:04 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/fossilized-remains-sea-monster-found

It is named Sollasina Cthulhu after the H. P. Lovecraft fictional sea beast.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on April 10, 2019, 05:32:31 PM
I bet it would be good with cocktail sauce.  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: GDS_Starfury on April 11, 2019, 12:47:06 AM
Very cool  :clap:  Now if they can just figure out where in the heck the other end comes out at...

brave question to ask here  :))
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: bayonetbrant on April 11, 2019, 04:37:05 AM
(https://scontent-atl3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/56922913_10113575029593795_2523385907369738240_n.jpg?_nc_cat=104&_nc_eui2=AeF6WfJsBIKACSfZDSxesYl2YoAUjWouMmYvSTDLFVKl4GfcoFhAp93odyvqqBkpjr_RvXRNFV5Ut_5FNWwfJIxTn4FuD8R9uMkyC01sqQcZXg&_nc_ht=scontent-atl3-1.xx&oh=4f0e08b93b6f4ad24669937456e72b09&oe=5D043E34)
Title: Vote to name largest minor planet in our solar system
Post by: steve58 on April 15, 2019, 07:33:49 AM
Quote
A minor planet discovered in our solar system over a decade ago remains nameless, and the astronomers who made the heavenly find are now turning to the public for help.

Meg Schwamb, Mike Brown and David Rabinowitz discovered (225088) 2007 OR10 on July 17, 2007, at the Palomar Observatory in California, although early traces of its existence date back to 1985. Using a 48-inch telescope, the trio identified what they called the largest unnamed world in our solar system as it orbited the Sun beyond Neptune in the Kuiper Belt.

For almost 12 years 2007 OR10 has kept the clinical designation given to it by the Minor Planet Center (MPC) but after years of analysis and research, Schwamb, Brown and Rabinowitz have selected three names they feel best suit the Minor Planet and have put the decision up to a vote on their website.

Participants will be able to choose one of three carefully selected names: Gonggong, Holle and Vili.

Each name was pre-selected to match requirements set by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) and has a special meaning that is relevant to the minor planet.

People will have until May 10 to submit their vote and the winner will be announced shortly after. It will then be submitted to the IAU for the final approval.

2007 OR10 consists largely of ice and rock, and astronomers believe that water may have existed on its surface at one point. In 2016 it was announced that the minor planet also had an orbiting moon.

The Minor Planet is not visible to the naked eye.



Vote here (https://2007or10.name/index.html#names).

Cast your vote by 11:59 pm PDT on May 10, 2019
Title: Re: Vote to name largest minor planet in our solar system
Post by: Pete Dero on April 15, 2019, 07:53:52 AM
Quote
A minor planet discovered in our solar system over a decade ago remains nameless, and the astronomers who made the heavenly find are now turning to the public for help.

Meg Schwamb, Mike Brown and David Rabinowitz discovered (225088) 2007 OR10 on July 17, 2007, at the Palomar Observatory in California, although early traces of its existence date back to 1985. Using a 48-inch telescope, the trio identified what they called the largest unnamed world in our solar system as it orbited the Sun beyond Neptune in the Kuiper Belt.

For almost 12 years 2007 OR10 has kept the clinical designation given to it by the Minor Planet Center (MPC) but after years of analysis and research, Schwamb, Brown and Rabinowitz have selected three names they feel best suit the Minor Planet and have put the decision up to a vote on their website.

Participants will be able to choose one of three carefully selected names: Gonggong, Holle and Vili.

Each name was pre-selected to match requirements set by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) and has a special meaning that is relevant to the minor planet.

People will have until May 10 to submit their vote and the winner will be announced shortly after. It will then be submitted to the IAU for the final approval.

2007 OR10 consists largely of ice and rock, and astronomers believe that water may have existed on its surface at one point. In 2016 it was announced that the minor planet also had an orbiting moon.

The Minor Planet is not visible to the naked eye.



Vote here (https://2007or10.name/index.html#names).

Cast your vote by 11:59 pm PDT on May 10, 2019

Good thing they offer a selection to choose from or they will end up with another Boaty McBoatface.

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/22/world/europe/boaty-mcboatface-what-you-get-when-you-let-the-internet-decide.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on April 15, 2019, 08:33:22 AM
^True dat.  I went with ViliHolle would be OK too, but Gonggong ???
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on April 15, 2019, 05:03:42 PM
^True dat.  I went with ViliHolle would be OK too, but Gonggong ???

Was a pretty easy choice for me as well, though I also could have lived with Holle.
Title: Re: Vote to name largest minor planet in our solar system
Post by: DoctorQuest on April 15, 2019, 08:25:46 PM
Quote
A minor planet discovered in our solar system over a decade ago remains nameless, and the astronomers who made the heavenly find are now turning to the public for help.

Meg Schwamb, Mike Brown and David Rabinowitz discovered (225088) 2007 OR10 on July 17, 2007, at the Palomar Observatory in California, although early traces of its existence date back to 1985. Using a 48-inch telescope, the trio identified what they called the largest unnamed world in our solar system as it orbited the Sun beyond Neptune in the Kuiper Belt.

For almost 12 years 2007 OR10 has kept the clinical designation given to it by the Minor Planet Center (MPC) but after years of analysis and research, Schwamb, Brown and Rabinowitz have selected three names they feel best suit the Minor Planet and have put the decision up to a vote on their website.

Participants will be able to choose one of three carefully selected names: Gonggong, Holle and Vili.

Each name was pre-selected to match requirements set by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) and has a special meaning that is relevant to the minor planet.

People will have until May 10 to submit their vote and the winner will be announced shortly after. It will then be submitted to the IAU for the final approval.

2007 OR10 consists largely of ice and rock, and astronomers believe that water may have existed on its surface at one point. In 2016 it was announced that the minor planet also had an orbiting moon.

The Minor Planet is not visible to the naked eye.



Vote here (https://2007or10.name/index.html#names).

Cast your vote by 11:59 pm PDT on May 10, 2019

Good thing they offer a selection to choose from or they will end up with another Boaty McBoatface.

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/22/world/europe/boaty-mcboatface-what-you-get-when-you-let-the-internet-decide.html

Agreed. Planety McPlanetface just does not have a ring to it.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on April 24, 2019, 04:03:50 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/goddard/2019/hubble-celebrates-29th-anniversary-with-a-colorful-look-at-the-southern-crab-nebula
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on April 24, 2019, 09:02:22 AM
Happy 29th Hubble. That's a lot of crab. Thanks for the post Labbug.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on April 25, 2019, 09:24:15 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/landslides-in-mars-cerberus-fossae
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on May 04, 2019, 02:16:58 PM
Hubble Astronomers Assemble Wide View of the Evolving Universe

Astronomers have put together the largest and most comprehensive "history book" of galaxies into one single image, using 16 years' worth of observations from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

The deep-sky mosaic, created from nearly 7,500 individual exposures, provides a wide portrait of the distant universe, containing 265,000 galaxies that stretch back through 13.3 billion years of time to just 500 million years after the big bang. The faintest and farthest galaxies are just one ten-billionth the brightness of what the human eye can see. The universe's evolutionary history is also chronicled in this one sweeping view. The portrait shows how galaxies change over time, building themselves up to become the giant galaxies seen in the nearby universe.

(https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/styles/full_width/public/thumbnails/image/stsci-h-p1917b-q-5198x4801.jpg?itok=m9Rwp0u4)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on May 07, 2019, 12:26:26 PM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/nasa-s-first-planetary-defense-technology-demonstration-to-collide-with-asteroid-in-2022
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on May 07, 2019, 12:41:12 PM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/nasa-s-first-planetary-defense-technology-demonstration-to-collide-with-asteroid-in-2022

Isn't that a Spaceforce job ?   ;)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on June 01, 2019, 05:58:54 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2019/nicer-s-night-moves-trace-the-x-ray-sky
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on June 07, 2019, 09:33:37 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/19th-century-military-compound-canadas-parliament
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on June 07, 2019, 09:47:09 AM
From a time long ago when Canadians... weren't... all friendly.  :o
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on June 07, 2019, 09:49:06 AM
From a time long ago when Canadians... weren't... all friendly.  :o

We were always friendly... it was you lot that invaded us....  :knuppel2:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on June 07, 2019, 01:21:11 PM
We were just trying to save you from having to play Hockey all year.  :hide:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on June 07, 2019, 03:53:05 PM
You were just jealous because the only “sport” you had was baseball.  :buck2:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on June 07, 2019, 10:02:45 PM
At least the sticks we play with are straight and not bent at the bottom.  :coolsmiley:  And in baseball there are no Penalty Boxes. We settle our differences with a good, old fashion brawl.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on June 12, 2019, 09:37:30 AM
Not cool but very hot :

Watch a Raging Forest Fire Surround You in 360 Degrees

In the NIST setup, a waterproof camera sits in a liquid-filled bulb made of heat-resistant glass.

Because it takes time to set up this system, Hoehler can only use it when he knows he has two to three hours before a fire reaches his site. For example, because the blaze at the New Jersey Pine Barrens was a “prescribed burn” (deliberately set to help with forest management), the fire service was able to tip off NIST team members well before the fire started. This gave the researchers plenty of time to set up their equipment and bury the water tank.


Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on June 18, 2019, 06:58:51 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/goddard/2019/feature/nasa-scientists-find-sun-s-history-buried-in-moon-s-crust
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on June 18, 2019, 08:15:50 AM
That is cool. Thanks for the story.  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on June 20, 2019, 09:01:51 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/no-alien-life-stars-study

Maybe they are laying low because they do not want human beings to come to their neighborhood.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on June 20, 2019, 02:38:49 PM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/no-alien-life-stars-study

Maybe they are laying low because they do not want human beings to come to their neighborhood.

Search only looked for radio signals and only among 1,300 stars in close proximity to Earth !
Even our own galaxy has billions of stars.

It is like searching for a cat in your garden and concluding that because you didn't see one that there are no animals on Earth.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on June 27, 2019, 11:59:59 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/nasa-headed-towards-giant-golden-asteroid-that-could-make-everyone-on-earth-a-billionaire
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on June 27, 2019, 01:05:37 PM
My ex-wife's lawyer already has that one claimed. Sorry.  :hide:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: DoctorQuest on June 28, 2019, 11:03:49 AM
https://www.npr.org/2019/06/27/736722760/nasa-will-send-a-drone-to-buzz-around-saturns-largest-moon
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on July 04, 2019, 08:57:45 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2019/hubble-captures-the-galaxys-biggest-ongoing-stellar-fireworks-show
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on July 04, 2019, 11:06:22 AM
Cool! Thanks for the post. O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on July 27, 2019, 09:43:58 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/in-a-lab-accident-scientists-create-the-first-ever-permanently-magnetic-liquid
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on July 27, 2019, 12:50:58 PM
Gotta love a science story that starts with “In a lab accident....”  ::)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on July 27, 2019, 05:51:54 PM
Gotta love a science story that starts with “In a lab accident....”  ::)

Coming from you that's actually a little unsettling...   ;D
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on July 29, 2019, 09:19:53 AM
That would be great prank material to put in someone's metal cup. Unless they had braces.  :hide:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on August 06, 2019, 07:07:20 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/new-finds-for-mars-rover-seven-years-after-landing
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on August 06, 2019, 07:43:57 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/in-a-lab-accident-scientists-create-the-first-ever-permanently-magnetic-liquid

So, just a matter of time now, eh?

Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: BanzaiCat on August 14, 2019, 07:20:37 AM
Just add a little A.I. to that...what could go wrong?  <:-)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Rekim on August 18, 2019, 06:13:20 PM
Russian robot Fedor is heading to the International Space Station this week for a visit.

https://www.newsweek.com/russia-space-bot-ai-iss-fedor-roscosmos-1454330


(https://d.newsweek.com/en/full/1520019/fedor.jpg?w=737&f=2ad39ec9e841a5836065985daa07fbe0)

what could go wrong /s

(https://www.sott.net/image/s21/436832/full/russiafedorrobot_1.jpg)


Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on August 18, 2019, 08:39:09 PM
Gheez Louise! Fedor is scary as shit. How would you like to try and get a good night's sleep with that thing prowling about?  :wow:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on September 02, 2019, 08:23:49 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/monstrous-space-explosions-may-be-showering-nearby-galaxy-in-gold
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on September 09, 2019, 01:12:05 PM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/mysterious-indus-valley-people-gave-rise-to-modern-day-south-asians
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on September 20, 2019, 03:38:16 PM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/mysterious-underground-continent-old-earth
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on September 30, 2019, 07:33:05 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/planet-9-primordial-black-hole

There goes the neighborhood.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Martok on September 30, 2019, 06:40:34 PM
Yeah, I read the black hole would be the size of a bowling ball.  Gnarly.  :D 
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on October 14, 2019, 08:10:03 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/space-elevator-moon-reality

The idea of a space elevator has always been interesting.  It certainly be a cheaper way to get into space and/or to the moon.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on October 22, 2019, 11:38:08 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/greedy-killer-monkeys-found-eating-large-rats-in-malaysia-leaving-scientists-stunned
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on October 22, 2019, 12:44:10 PM
Great news! Until they run out of rats. Then..... :coolsmiley:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on October 22, 2019, 02:08:12 PM
Great news! Until they run out of rats. Then..... :coolsmiley:

...ship'em on over to DC.  Lots of d'Rats there  >:D
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on October 22, 2019, 09:20:39 PM
That is too true Steve. Too true.  :clap:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on October 29, 2019, 07:27:21 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/nasa-hubble-telescope-ghostly-face-image

https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/goddard/2019/menacing-looking-face-formed-by-titanic-smashup-between-two-galaxies
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on October 29, 2019, 08:32:27 AM
Looks like C3PO. Remember, he was a God to the Ewoks.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: besilarius on November 05, 2019, 10:14:43 AM
Voyager 2 reports on the heliosphere.

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/nov/04/nasa-voyager-2-sends-back-first-signal-from-interstellar-space
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Martok on November 05, 2019, 10:48:18 PM
That is both awesome and humbling. 
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on November 08, 2019, 03:13:11 PM
what martok said   
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on November 18, 2019, 07:58:12 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/star-ejected-from-milky-way-galaxy
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on November 18, 2019, 09:40:43 AM
If you don't pay your Milky Way dues, you get bounced Bitch.  :knuppel2:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on December 09, 2019, 09:08:44 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/student-solves-a-decades-old-physics-mystery
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on December 17, 2019, 08:34:15 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2019/nasa-s-sdo-sees-new-kind-of-magnetic-explosion-on-sun
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on December 23, 2019, 05:28:27 PM
https://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/hubble-s-caldwell-catalog/
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Martok on December 23, 2019, 11:21:09 PM
Very cool! 
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on January 10, 2020, 09:38:43 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/sofia-reveals-new-view-of-milky-way-s-center
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on January 14, 2020, 07:38:20 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/dying-fish-revealed-congo-is-worlds-deepest-river
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on January 14, 2020, 07:56:42 AM
I remember the, 'River Monsters' show guy did a special on the Congo a couple of years back and I was fascinated to learn a lot of this stuff for the first time.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on January 30, 2020, 10:06:40 AM
Most detailed images ever of the sun's surface.  Wow!

https://abcnews.go.com/US/solar-telescope-produces-images-suns-surface-unprecedented-detail/story?id=68639488

(http://pbs.twimg.com/media/EPd8pxKX4AAoiiZ?format=jpg&name=medium)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on January 30, 2020, 10:35:53 AM
Very cool!  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on February 07, 2020, 09:16:16 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/chernobyl-fungi-eats-radiation
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 07, 2020, 11:21:26 AM
Godzilla Fungus? How bad could this turn-out to be?  :hide:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on February 07, 2020, 11:24:53 AM
Hope no spiders get in (or out of :o) there (@Martok) :D
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Martok on February 07, 2020, 10:08:48 PM
Hope no spiders get in (or out of :o) there (@Martok) :D

Ahem, I think we should *all* be hoping that.  :P 
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on February 10, 2020, 09:38:00 AM
Hope no spiders get in (or out of :o) there (@Martok) :D

Ahem, I think we should *all* be hoping that.  :P

If you look at ground and vegetation environment hunting spiders; it would only take one the size of a smallish dog to put us on their menu.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 10, 2020, 10:13:08 AM
I've got ones bigger than that living in my shed right now. At least they keep the rats out. And me too. They can have my ladder and wheelbarrow, I don't need them THAT bad.  :hide:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on February 10, 2020, 12:44:41 PM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/mysterious-signal-deep-space-repeating-16-day-cycle
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Martok on February 10, 2020, 03:25:15 PM
 :o
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on February 14, 2020, 08:21:48 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/fossils-prehistoric-human-sized-rat-discovered-south-america
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on February 19, 2020, 09:49:42 AM
I've got ones bigger than that living in my shed right now. At least they keep the rats out. And me too. They can have my ladder and wheelbarrow, I don't need them THAT bad.  :hide:

You definitely should consider using fire.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 19, 2020, 10:48:23 AM
Napalm?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on February 19, 2020, 01:52:57 PM
Plasma?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 19, 2020, 05:30:14 PM
Drones with Nukes?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on February 21, 2020, 01:47:23 PM
Drones with Nukes?

Autonomous drones with nukes.....
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 21, 2020, 08:59:41 PM
…. Tipped with Pit Bulls with H.I.V.?  :coolsmiley:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on February 28, 2020, 06:57:43 PM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/2000-year-old-silver-dagger-roman-soldier-unearthed
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 28, 2020, 09:09:27 PM
Wondered where I left that. I thought it was at the brothel in Pompeii.  :hide:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on March 02, 2020, 11:31:27 AM
Wondered where I left that. I thought it was at the brothel in Pompeii.  :hide:

No, I saw you put it down there... you forgetful git.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on March 02, 2020, 05:32:58 PM
Must've been that cheap wine I was drinking, Mad Dog 20 A.D.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on March 12, 2020, 07:16:47 AM
Looks like a break through in quantum computing.

https://www.foxnews.com/tech/engineers-crack-58-year-old-enigma-make-quantum-breakthrough

Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on March 25, 2020, 03:03:58 PM
New comet incoming.  Say hello to Comet Atlas.

Quote
So bright that it can now be seen by amateur astronomers with binoculars. It is expected to reach its peak brightness at the end of May. Making it even more exciting is its color—slightly green.

https://phys.org/news/2020-03-comet-atlas.html

Hopefully, coronavirus will be waning by then, because you know comets + humans = panic :crazy2: etc

Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on April 08, 2020, 02:19:04 PM
https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/chandra/news/universe-s-expansion-may-not-be-the-same-in-all-directions.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on April 17, 2020, 08:30:45 AM
Robotic spacecraft caught an old satellite and extends its life (https://www.cnbc.com/2020/04/17/northrop-grumman-mev-1-spacecraft-services-intelsat-901-satellite.html)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Barthheart on April 17, 2020, 08:34:08 AM
Robotic spacecraft caught an old satellite and extends its life (https://www.cnbc.com/2020/04/17/northrop-grumman-mev-1-spacecraft-services-intelsat-901-satellite.html)

Very cool!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on April 22, 2020, 07:16:34 PM
https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/the-black-marble-our-planet-in-brilliant-darkness
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on April 22, 2020, 09:11:15 PM
If you look real close, you can see me cooking burgers on the grill. I'm the one on the left.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on May 19, 2020, 07:57:09 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/top-ten-discoveries-from-sofia
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on June 01, 2020, 11:10:39 AM
An interstellar hydrogen iceberg, who would have thought it?

https://www.foxnews.com/science/mysterious-interstellar-oumuamua-could-be-made-of-something-almost-unheard-of-in-science
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on June 03, 2020, 08:42:29 AM
Hydrogen Ice!?   :o Hillary's Home World?  ^-^     Sorry, that was too easy.  ::)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on June 18, 2020, 05:48:43 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/a-cosmic-baby-is-discovered-and-its-brilliant
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Martok on June 19, 2020, 01:44:41 AM
Wow!  That's gotta be one of the youngest stellar objects yet found.  :o 

Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on June 19, 2020, 02:25:54 AM
Wow!  That's gotta be one of the youngest stellar objects yet found.  :o

And you can watch it disappear as it cools in just a few million years ...

Having astronomy as a hobby is very sobering  :(.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on July 02, 2020, 09:51:35 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/a-monster-star-2-million-times-brighter-than-the-sun-disappears-without-a-trace
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week? Comet Neowise
Post by: steve58 on July 14, 2020, 10:17:54 AM
Comet Neowise as seen from the International Space Station.  Jump to the 3 minute mark.



http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2020/07/14/comet-neowise-2020-see-comet-artists-stunning-video/5433412002/
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on July 16, 2020, 08:17:56 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2020/solar-orbiter-returns-first-data-snaps-closest-pictures-of-the-sun
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Lotti Fuehrscheim on July 16, 2020, 12:28:23 PM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2020/solar-orbiter-returns-first-data-snaps-closest-pictures-of-the-sun

Those are some mighty magnetic knots cooking in there.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on July 22, 2020, 03:49:54 PM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/scientists-accidentally-create-impossible-hybrid-fish
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on July 22, 2020, 09:39:20 PM
Great news! Now they can get to work on that Monkey/Octopus Hybrid to tend bars.  :bd:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on July 31, 2020, 01:22:27 PM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/chernobyl-fungus-could-protect-astronauts-radiation-deep-space-missions
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on July 31, 2020, 01:37:51 PM
So what do the astronauts wear it or eat it?  :o
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on August 16, 2020, 02:53:32 PM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2020/hubble-finds-that-betelgeuses-mysterious-dimming-is-due-to-a-traumatic-outburst

I guess you can say Betelgeuses passed gas.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on August 21, 2020, 08:36:26 AM
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/scientists-find-evidence-for-einstein-s-general-relativity-in-the-cores-of-dead-stars/ar-BB18e9h4
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on August 26, 2020, 06:31:39 AM
https://gizmodo.com/trillions-of-rogue-planets-could-be-careening-through-o-1844840137?ocid=uxbndlbing
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on August 27, 2020, 09:00:59 AM
https://www.ign.com/articles/star-wars-tie-fighter-galaxy-nasa
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on September 06, 2020, 06:04:26 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/moon-rusting-scientists-stunned
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on September 06, 2020, 09:22:05 PM
Damn! The next mission up there better take some WD-40 with them.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: airboy on September 06, 2020, 09:53:58 PM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/moon-rusting-scientists-stunned

The life they are expecting is perhaps - Rust Monsters!  Flee ye fighters with plate armor!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on September 07, 2020, 01:12:44 PM
I feel like a Rust Monster every morning when I try to get out of bed.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on September 08, 2020, 08:48:56 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/chandra/news/nasas-chandra-opens-treasure-trove-of-cosmic-delights.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: PeaceFlower on September 13, 2020, 05:29:37 PM
Tomorrow,  there will be a big announcement concerning Venus. They (academic researchers) have
discovered the presence of an (atmospheric) chemical there named "Phosphine" which only occurs in
relation to biological processes. There is no known way to make
this naturally, even in a hellhole like  Venus. Basically they have ruled
out everything else, which leaves only life as the main contender in
this scenario. So it is not definitive proof but about as close as
you can get short of that.

There was a leaked press release a few days ago that surfaced on the
reddit UFO forum. Despite that provenance, it seems to be corroborated
by other sources.

This is a snapshot of the premature release before it was deleted.

(https://i.imgur.com/AHRyZQ0.jpg)

Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: PeaceFlower on September 14, 2020, 07:27:26 AM
The press conference starts in about 90 minutes by the Royal Astronomical Society here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5IIj3e5BFp0&feature=youtu.be (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5IIj3e5BFp0&feature=youtu.be)
So, tune in if you are interested in this kind of astronomical sleuthing.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on September 14, 2020, 07:44:47 AM
The press conference starts in about 90 minutes by the Royal Astronomical Society here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5IIj3e5BFp0&feature=youtu.be (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5IIj3e5BFp0&feature=youtu.be)
So, tune in if you are interested in this kind of astronomical sleuthing.

Thank you for posting.  As an amateur astronomer I do find this interesting.

However life on Venus ?

(https://thewarrantofficerorg.files.wordpress.com/2020/03/star-trek.jpg)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: solops on September 14, 2020, 08:52:45 AM
Acid based oozes that secret a strong base to kill their foes/prey.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on September 14, 2020, 09:22:30 AM
I like the idea of giant Blimp-Creatures floating around the atmosphere living off the nutrients in the clouds and hiding from us in the mist, "Hindenberg-lings". Or maybe, "Dirigible Whales".  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Gusington on September 14, 2020, 11:14:46 AM
Gigantic flying sky monkeys.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on September 14, 2020, 11:47:18 AM
(http://media1.tenor.com/images/158125dba625855ee6db405b6ed930c2/tenor.gif?itemid=13656999)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Gusington on September 14, 2020, 12:28:24 PM
HAHAHA LOOK OUT
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: SirAndrewD on September 14, 2020, 12:51:57 PM
Very interesting. 

I remember reading Clarke's novel 2010 and it postulated something similar in the atmosphere of Jupiter. 

A subplot missing from the movies is that Dave Boman/Monolith Aliens had to choose between the life budding on Europa, or life that existed in a much more advanced state in the clouds of Jupiter.  The Aliens chose Europa and caused Jupiter to go into stellar fusion in a cold calculation that Jupiter's gaseous lifeforms were an evolutionary dead end where Europa had a chance of much further development. 

Fascinating to think of something like that possible at Venus.  I remember Sagan postulating about it in the 80's too.  Maybe we'll stop neglecting it in our exploration.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on September 14, 2020, 02:24:21 PM
https://skyandtelescope.org/astronomy-news/potential-biosignature-found-in-venuss-clouds/

So, Is There Life on Venus?

The surface of Venus is harsh, as seen in this view from Venera 13, which survived only briefly after landing on March 1, 1982. Life, if it exists, has a better chance in Venus's more temperature (but still highly acidic) atmosphere.

David Grinspoon (Planetary Science Institute), an expert on Venus who was not involved in the project, says that the result will be contentious, in part because the discovery is based on a single absorption line.

“People will look very critically at this. As they should,” Grinspoon said. “We don't want to jump to the wrong conclusion about something this important.”

The team is confident in the analysis but agrees that independent observations are needed to detect other phosphine absorption lines in order to verify the detection. As for whether the phosphine on Venus is a biosignature, they’re agnostic.

“My gut tells me an unknown photochemical process is going on,” says team member William Bains (MIT). “I think the chances of there being life on Venus are very small.”


https://www.space.com/venus-clouds-possible-life-chemical-discovery.html

As tantalizing as the detection of phosphine on Venus may be, scientists not involved with the new research worry that it makes a few big leaps, even before the massive potential implications of a detection of life.

Some were unconvinced that phosphine was a reliable fingerprint of living organisms. The single phosphorus molecule surrounded by three hydrogen molecules is, on Earth, a rarity and short-lived: some industrial processes produce it, and it's affiliated with some types of bacteria living in particularly strange environments. It quickly transforms in Earth's oxygen-rich atmosphere and should in that of Venus as well, which is intriguing for scientists looking for alien breath. But the excitement about phosphine may well be premature.

"The phosphine link to the biological world is very, very faint and needs to be corroborated simply by going to the lab and doing experiments," Tetyana Milojevic, a biochemist at the University of Vienna not involved in the new research, told Space.com.

She argues that phosphine has only been found near microbes, not produced by it, and that the compound seems to be released by the chemical decay of biological material. So before scientists can use phosphine as a potential biosignature, they need to get into the lab and really understand whether and how microbes produce phosphine, a process that scientists eyeing Mars completed for methane long ago.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Gusington on September 14, 2020, 07:14:40 PM
'unknown photochemical process'  ???
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on September 14, 2020, 08:25:34 PM
Meanwhile, a whole day and not one reference to Uranus. Superb restraint Gentlemen.  :clap:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Gusington on September 14, 2020, 08:49:55 PM
 :2funny:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on September 15, 2020, 11:38:10 AM
Meanwhile, a whole day and not one reference to Uranus. Superb restraint Gentlemen.  :clap:

I would have made a crass comment, but I was just leaving someone's mom's house
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on September 15, 2020, 01:42:37 PM
Oh? Mothers are experts on Uranus. Mine was but seemed to believe it needed washing a lot.  :idiot2:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on October 06, 2020, 10:25:52 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/24-superhabitable-planets-discovered-close-earth
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on October 12, 2020, 07:22:45 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/hairy-caterpillar-virginia-puss-caterpillar-venomous-insect-hair
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on October 12, 2020, 09:20:04 AM
That looks like one of Gus' old hair-pieces. Can't remember if they crawl by themselves too?  ;)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on October 14, 2020, 08:57:21 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/astronomers-watched-a-black-hole-destroy-a-star-in-real-time
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on October 14, 2020, 09:54:09 AM
Is that what that was? I thought it was the Cowboys season going down the drain.  :hug:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on October 15, 2020, 12:54:38 PM
Is that what that was? I thought it was the Cowboys season going down the drain.  :hug:

Election integrity in the USA?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Gusington on October 15, 2020, 01:11:36 PM
That looked more like YO MAMA's hairpiece.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on October 15, 2020, 08:46:23 PM
Windy had a Momma?  :o  I thought you all told me he was a product of Spontaneous Combustion? Now I don't know what to believe.  ???
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on October 23, 2020, 09:42:19 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/tectonic-plate-lost-for-60m-years-found-hiding-under-pacific-ocean
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on October 23, 2020, 12:36:36 PM
NASA to reveal Moon 'new discovery' Monday (https://www.foxnews.com/science/nasa-unveil-exciting-new-discovery-moon).

p.s.  never knew NASA had a flying 100-inch telescope (SOFIA (https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/SOFIA/overview/index.html))!  :o  How the heck do they manage to keep an airborne 747 stable enough for a telescope?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on October 23, 2020, 09:07:07 PM
Have they FINALLY found Jimmy Hoffa you think?  :o
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on October 24, 2020, 02:12:30 AM
How the heck do they manage to keep an airborne 747 stable enough for a telescope?

You don't stabilize the 747 but you stabilize the telescope :

https://www.sofia.usra.edu/multimedia/about-sofia/faqs#T3

You isolate the telescope from the airplane by mounting it on a spherical pressurized oil bearing. The plane shakes and quakes, but the telescope doesn't feel it. Second, you direct the wind away from the telescope by shaping the side of the airplane so as to deflect it, and install a little deflector fence on the edge of the telescope cavity as well. Third, you stabilize the telescope against sudden motion (wind does get through) by spinning three orthogonal gyroscopes which are rigidly attached to the structure, and fourth, you steer the telescope so as to keep it steady, by tracking a distant star and giving the telescope magnetical nudges to point it toward a fixed direction.

https://www.sofia.usra.edu/multimedia/about-sofia/faqs#top
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on October 24, 2020, 08:18:59 AM
^makes sense.  Thx Pete.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on October 25, 2020, 07:12:08 AM
This one really is cool:  https://www.cnet.com/news/super-cool-white-paint-basically-creates-free-air-conditioning/

...and this one is for the environment:  https://insidescience.org/news/new-technique-turns-waste-plastic-valuable-chemicals
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Gusington on October 25, 2020, 11:30:09 AM
That last one can save the oceans!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on October 25, 2020, 02:15:20 PM
That last one can save the oceans!

Or we could stop using plastic.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on October 26, 2020, 06:07:57 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/glenn/2020/the-propulsion-we-re-supplying-it-s-electrifying
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Gusington on October 26, 2020, 08:41:08 AM
Whatever you say Pete. But since that hasn't happened yet and probably won't in our great grandkids' lifetime, I like the above posted solution.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Ubercat on October 26, 2020, 09:35:47 AM
That last one can save the oceans!

Or we could stop using plastic.

Go back to making everything out of metal and glass?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on October 26, 2020, 09:39:35 AM
You can have my plastic straw when you pry it from my cold, dead fingers. The problem's not the plastic, it's the chuckle-heads that throw it into the oceans. Or wherever other than the trash where you should. If you can re-cycle bad habits into good ones, that'd do the trick.  :bd:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on October 26, 2020, 01:22:06 PM
Water found on the sunny side of Moon (https://www.foxnews.com/science/nasa-moon-announcement-water-surface)

NASA to reveal Moon 'new discovery' Monday (https://www.foxnews.com/science/nasa-unveil-exciting-new-discovery-moon).

p.s.  never knew NASA had a flying 100-inch telescope (SOFIA (https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/SOFIA/overview/index.html))!  :o  How the heck do they manage to keep an airborne 747 stable enough for a telescope?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on October 26, 2020, 01:42:46 PM
^ I must correct you : the moon doesn't have a sunny side  :nerd:.

The moon's rotation is locked so we always see the same side but that doesn't mean the other side doesn't get any sunlight.  When it is new moon the side of the moon we can't see is bathing in sunlight.
Previously water was found in crater floors that never receive any sunlight but this time it seems they discovered water in areas that are exposed to the sun.

Nerd hat off  :peace:.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on October 26, 2020, 01:55:19 PM
yeah, I typed sunny when I shoulda typed sunlit.  :-[
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on October 29, 2020, 06:54:44 AM
Talk about heavy metal!

https://www.foxnews.com/science/asteroid-discovered-170-years-ago-worth-10000-quadrillion
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on October 29, 2020, 08:01:25 AM
Damn! That's quite a haul if we could get our hands on it.  :bd:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: GDS_Starfury on October 29, 2020, 08:43:53 PM
and people think spacex is going to mars first.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on November 17, 2020, 11:56:45 AM
A volcano erupted in Italy (https://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/ny-stromboli-volcano-sicily-erupts-high-intensity-blast-20201116-srepoc4bfncmfej3rmlx6hfptm-story.html).  The eruption was captured by a number of cameras from the the Italian National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology, including some that record thermal footage to measure the heat of the blasts.  Pretty cool :))

Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on November 17, 2020, 05:17:27 PM
Nice.  :clap:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on November 20, 2020, 02:28:59 PM
Very interesting. 

I remember reading Clarke's novel 2010 and it postulated something similar in the atmosphere of Jupiter. 

A subplot missing from the movies is that Dave Boman/Monolith Aliens had to choose between the life budding on Europa, or life that existed in a much more advanced state in the clouds of Jupiter.  The Aliens chose Europa and caused Jupiter to go into stellar fusion in a cold calculation that Jupiter's gaseous lifeforms were an evolutionary dead end where Europa had a chance of much further development. 

Fascinating to think of something like that possible at Venus.  I remember Sagan postulating about it in the 80's too.  Maybe we'll stop neglecting it in our exploration.

Update :

https://skyandtelescope.org/astronomy-news/phosphine-biosignature-venus-calibration-error/

Is the Phosphine Biosignature on Venus a Calibration Error?

The problem arose because Venus is not a “standard” target for ALMA. The array of radio dishes spends most of its time looking at things that very far away, and thus very faint.

“Observing solar system objects is quite a small part of what ALMA does,” Greaves says. “ALMA is learning from this situation as well, in terms of future observations. We're not the only project affected. They've had to contact a number of other principal investigators.”

Looking for something barely visible (the phosphine absorption line) inside a large, bright, nearby object (Venus) creates large uncertainties with the interpretation of the subsequent data. It’s possible to see things that aren’t there, in the same way that looking at a bright light causes afterimages when your eyes are closed.

“ALMA told us, ‘we've never tried to push the limits of getting a faint line in this way before,’” Greaves says. “So it was a risk. And obviously I'm not comfortable with finding out the drawbacks afterwards. But we did want the community to look at it and that's what they have done.”
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on November 23, 2020, 12:54:21 PM
Earthers haven't seen this view since 1226 (https://www.foxnews.com/science/jupiter-saturn-double-planet-not-seen-nearly-800-years).
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on November 23, 2020, 05:33:10 PM
WOW! Thanks for the heads-up.  :wow:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Myrmidon on November 29, 2020, 07:29:39 AM
Pretty interesting stuff here... this potentially could be a game changer in the rocketry field.

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/holy-grail-metallic-hydrogen-is-going-to-change-everything?utm_source=pocket-newtab
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on November 29, 2020, 10:12:44 AM
Very cool!  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on December 03, 2020, 06:58:33 PM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2020/hubble-captures-unprecedented-fading-of-stingray-nebula
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on December 07, 2020, 08:57:35 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/christmas-star-is-coming-jupiter-saturn-double-planet-800-years
https://www.foxnews.com/science/geminid-meteor-shower-is-coming-what-to-know
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on December 09, 2020, 02:08:32 PM
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/iridescent-snake-with-shimmering-scales-discovered-in-vietnam/ar-BB1bLbQM?ocid=msedgdhp
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on December 09, 2020, 05:36:59 PM
Cool!  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on December 17, 2020, 08:09:51 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-supports-americas-national-strategy-for-space-nuclear-power-and-propulsion
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on December 19, 2020, 08:11:38 AM
Great conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn

Jupiter and Saturn creep closer together in the southwest at nightfall.  This evening Saturn is only 0.3° above Jupiter, as shown below in twilight. That's hardly the width of a chopstick at arm's length. They're closing toward a mere 0.1° apart on December 21st, toothpick width! After that they widen again.

(https://skyandtelescope.org/wp-content/uploads/PR_Vic_2020Dec21ev_hor_2048px-900x508.jpg)


If you miss it don't worry : the next close conjunction is in 2080  :'(.

To find an equal to the current event, we'll have to wait until March 15, 2080. That morning, the duo will be just 6.0′ apart in Capricornus at the start of dawn. Not until sometime after 2400 will we see Jupiter and Saturn approach so closely again.
(on November 4, 2040, at dawn the planets will be separated by a much larger 1.2° in Virgo)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on December 19, 2020, 12:05:06 PM
I got my chopsticks and I'm ready to go.  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on December 21, 2020, 02:45:40 PM
56,000 years old wolf pup remains found in Klondike goldfields (https://edition.cnn.com/2020/12/21/americas/frozen-puppy-yukon-intl-scli-scn/index.html).

OK, OK, no pup-sicle jokes! :knuppel2: #:-) 
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on December 22, 2020, 08:07:35 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/three-asteroids-bigger-washington-monument-fly-past-earth-christmas-day
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on December 22, 2020, 08:21:53 AM
Looks like it's gonna be Christmas in The Bunker again.  :hide:  Good thing I got fresh TP and Booze down there.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on December 29, 2020, 07:55:09 AM


Launched in 2011, Nasa's Juno spacecraft continues to send back stunning images from the Solar System's biggest planet - Jupiter.

The probe captured imagery of the gas giant's swirling cloud decks as it performed its 27th close flyby of the world on 2 June.

Citizen scientist Kevin M Gill then transformed the data into a video, which combines 41 still images taken during Juno's close pass.

The stills were digitally projected onto a sphere, with a virtual "camera" providing views of Jupiter from different angles.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Gusington on December 29, 2020, 09:21:55 AM
^That is amazing.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on December 29, 2020, 01:18:13 PM
Very cool!  :clap:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on January 04, 2021, 07:41:20 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/first-interstellar-object-alien-technology-harvard-professor-claims

An interesting theory.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Gusington on January 04, 2021, 07:56:14 AM
^That theory creeps me the hell out, I don't know why. The professor's book sounds great though, I am going to have to read it.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on January 04, 2021, 07:56:41 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/first-interstellar-object-alien-technology-harvard-professor-claims

An interesting theory.

Despite pushback from some in the scientific community, one researcher at Harvard University is moving forward with the idea that the first interstellar object ever discovered is actually a piece of alien technology.

Only 4 days and we already have the understatement of the year.

https://www.usnews.com/news/national-news/articles/2019-07-01/strange-interstellar-object-oumuamua-isnt-aliens-study-says
https://www.space.com/interstellar-oumuamua-not-an-alien-spacecraft.html
https://www.extremetech.com/extreme/294383-scientists-sorry-oumuamua-still-isnt-an-alien-spaceship
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Gusington on January 04, 2021, 07:59:29 AM
I'm still going to read his book.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on January 04, 2021, 08:22:46 AM
I'm still going to read his book.

>:D

 
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on January 04, 2021, 08:26:55 AM
https://skyandtelescope.org/astronomy-news/oumuamua-comet-fragment/

‘Oumuamua’s strange trajectory can be explained if the object was a comet fragment with the density of air.

https://www.space.com/oumuamua-could-be-cosmic-dust-bunny.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Gusington on January 04, 2021, 08:44:42 AM
'Cosmic Dust Bunny' - I like it.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on January 15, 2021, 12:50:39 PM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/direwolves-game-of-thrones-real-but-went-extinct
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: PeaceFlower on January 15, 2021, 02:45:07 PM
Don't see where this has been mentioned here yet and this story broke about a month ago, anyway...

A signal was detected by SETI researchers and the news
was leaked before they could publish their papers. Commentators
are leaning over backwards to explain that it is almost certainly
a human false positive. However, the research does use filters to eliminate
most false positives and what makes this signal different is that
it has so far, been able to elude being traced to any human activity. So,
although skepticism is in order here, it is an
interesting story nonetheless which is yet to be resolved.


https://www.space.com/proxima-centauri-mystery-radio-beam (https://www.space.com/proxima-centauri-mystery-radio-beam)

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/alien-hunters-discover-mysterious-signal-from-proxima-centauri/ (https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/alien-hunters-discover-mysterious-signal-from-proxima-centauri/)

https://davidbrin.blogspot.com/2020/12/final-2020-note-preliminary-thoughts-on.html (https://davidbrin.blogspot.com/2020/12/final-2020-note-preliminary-thoughts-on.html)

https://www.reddit.com/r/BLC1/ (https://www.reddit.com/r/BLC1/)



Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on January 18, 2021, 08:19:50 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/150m-year-oldshark-discovered-germany
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on January 19, 2021, 08:00:31 AM
https://www.foxnews.com/science/super-puff-planet-unlike-any-other-could-change-explore-universe
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on January 23, 2021, 09:50:33 AM
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/mysterious-20-million-year-old-tunnels-in-the-ancient-ocean-floor-came-from-6-foot-long-carnivorous-worms-a-study-found/ar-BB1d1HRE?ocid=msedgdhp
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on January 23, 2021, 08:45:35 PM
Are we sure they're really gone?  :hide:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on January 26, 2021, 09:31:50 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2021/unique-solar-system-views-from-nasa-sun-studying-missions
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on February 14, 2021, 08:37:21 AM
Mars Perseverance rover to land (hopefully) this Thursday.

https://www.space.com/nasa-mars-valentine-perseverance-rover-landing
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on February 18, 2021, 08:04:00 AM
Mars Perseverance rover to land (hopefully) this Thursday.

https://www.space.com/nasa-mars-valentine-perseverance-rover-landing

Landing is approximately 3:55 ET Earth time  8)

https://www.space.com/17933-nasa-television-webcasts-live-space-tv.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 18, 2021, 10:09:18 AM
Thanks for the Heads-Up Steve. Can't wait to see how the Giant Sandworms are doing this year.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on February 22, 2021, 03:21:20 PM
NASA has released the Perseverance touchdown video.  Very cool!

Title: First 360-degree view of the landing site of NASA’s Perseverance rover
Post by: steve58 on February 23, 2021, 09:21:54 AM
This video shows the first 360-degree view of the landing site of NASA’s Perseverance rover on Mars, as captured by the rover’s color Navigation Cameras, or Navcams. The Navcams are on the remote sensing mast (or “head”) of the rover.  Perseverance possesses the most cameras of any Mars rover to date, with 19 on the rover. Perseverance landed on Mars’ Jezero Crater on February 18, 2021. These images were obtained on February 20, 2021.

Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Gusington on February 23, 2021, 09:46:13 AM
So very cool cool and nerdly at the same time!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 23, 2021, 09:04:49 PM
Cool and nerdy. Kind of like Pee Wee Herman driving a Porsche. The place could use some Daffodils for certain.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on February 25, 2021, 03:56:37 PM
"Easter eggs" on Mars. (https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/nasa-mars-rovers-parachute-contained-a-secret-message/ar-BB1dYH1N)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 25, 2021, 09:15:05 PM
Damn! I had the Blondie song about the Man From Mars in the office pool.  #:-)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Labbug on March 03, 2021, 10:04:27 AM
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2021/comet-makes-a-pit-stop-near-jupiters-asteroids
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: ArizonaTank on March 05, 2021, 07:32:06 AM
Recently released peer reviewed paper from the Advanced Propulsion Lab lays out an apparently workable theory for a warp drive.

This is a huge improvement over the Alcubierre warp drive described in the 1990s. The Alcubierre drive would require more energy to operate than is really possible to use.

The new theoretical drive apparently needs much less energy and is almost starting to look feasible.

Still we are probably 100 years away from actually seeing one...maybe something our great grandchildren will have.

It is kind of cool that the term "warp drive" has gone from science fiction to use in actual scientific studies.

The paper is here...but damned if I'll ever really be able to fully understand it.

https://arxiv.org/pdf/2102.06824.pdf (https://arxiv.org/pdf/2102.06824.pdf)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Gusington on March 05, 2021, 08:13:25 AM
Holy crap  \m/
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on March 05, 2021, 09:48:34 AM
Wow!  :wow:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: ArizonaTank on March 05, 2021, 01:09:23 PM
Some more info on the recent warp drive theory.

A nice explanation from Sabine Hossenfelder who is a Research Fellow at the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies where she leads the Superfluid Dark Matter group.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8VWLjhJBCp0&t=326s (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8VWLjhJBCp0&t=326s)

and a nice layman's explanation of the most recent model

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/scientists-announce-a-physical-warp-drive-is-now-possible-seriously/ar-BB1ehxp4?ocid=msedgntp (https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/scientists-announce-a-physical-warp-drive-is-now-possible-seriously/ar-BB1ehxp4?ocid=msedgntp)

Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on March 05, 2021, 01:22:20 PM
https://www.twitch.tv/videos/937725331

Spacewalk at the International Space Station !
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Silent Disapproval Robot on March 10, 2021, 05:46:00 PM
Some interesting views on the origins of humanity.

Fossils may indicate that human ancestors evolved in Europe.

https://bigthink.com/surprising-science/evolution-europe (https://bigthink.com/surprising-science/evolution-europe) 

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170523083548.htm (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170523083548.htm)



Musings on the above mentioned article and a deep dive into the possibility that humanity was genetically engineered.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on March 11, 2021, 02:32:38 AM
^ For me this belongs to religion and has nothing to do with science.

Just another example of 'we humans are so special in the universe so we have to be created by someone or something'.

This isn't R&P so I'll stop here.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Silent Disapproval Robot on March 11, 2021, 03:12:52 AM
Screwed up the url links when I first posted.  They're fixed now.  Have a look.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on March 11, 2021, 06:55:54 AM
Screwed up the url links when I first posted.  They're fixed now.  Have a look.

Read the articles and want to add that my remark above is only about the YT video.

Contrary to what he pretends Darwin's theory does explain the existence of humans.  Whether the first examples are found in Europe or in Africa is rather unimportant to the theory.


https://www.livescience.com/474-controversy-evolution-works.html

Even though scientists could predict what early whales should look like, they lacked the fossil evidence to back up their claim. Creationists took this absence as proof that evolution didn't occur. They mocked the idea that there could have ever been such a thing as a walking whale. But since the early 1990s, that's exactly what scientists have been finding.

The critical piece of evidence came in 1994, when paleontologists found the fossilized remains of Ambulocetus natans, an animal whose name literally means "swimming-walking whale." Its forelimbs had fingers and small hooves but its hind feet were enormous given its size. It was clearly adapted for swimming, but it was also capable of moving clumsily on land, much like a seal.

When it swam, the ancient creature moved like an otter, pushing back with its hind feet and undulating its spine and tail.

Modern whales propel themselves through the water with powerful beats of their horizontal tail flukes, but Ambulocetus still had a whip-like tail and had to use its legs to provide most of the propulsive force needed to move through water.

In recent years, more and more of these transitional species, or "missing links," have been discovered, lending further support to Darwin's theory, Richmond said.

Fossil "links" have also been found to support human evolution. In early 2018, a fossilized jaw and teeth found that are estimated to be up to 194,000 years old, making them at least 50,000 years older than modern human fossils previously found outside Africa. This finding provides another clue to how humans have evolved.



https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-scientists-discovered-the-staggering-complexity-of-human-evolution/

Since then, Wood says, “the evidence has come in.” In the past century and a half, science has confirmed Darwin's prediction and pieced together a detailed account of our origins. Paleoanthropologists have recovered fossil hominins (the group that comprises H. sapiens and its extinct relatives) spanning the past seven million years. This extraordinary record shows that hominins indeed got their start in Africa, where they evolved from quadrupedal apes into the upright-walking, nimble-fingered, large-brained creatures we are today.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on March 11, 2021, 08:52:33 AM
But Who created Evolution? And Darwin for that matter? Sooner or later you get to the, 'Who came first, the Chicken or the Egg' question. That's where God comes in.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on March 11, 2021, 09:11:04 AM
That's where God comes in.

That is a scientist I don't know.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: ArizonaTank on March 24, 2021, 08:37:20 AM
In a very cool nod to history, the Mars helicopter named "Ingenuity," carries a small swatch of cloth from the under wing of the original 1903 Wright Flyer (the one that made the first powered flight at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina on December 17th, 1903).

Ingenuity is set to take its first flight in April.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/part-of-wright-brothers-1st-airplane-on-nasas-mars-chopper/ar-BB1eUDhE?ocid=msedgntp (https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/part-of-wright-brothers-1st-airplane-on-nasas-mars-chopper/ar-BB1eUDhE?ocid=msedgntp)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: ArizonaTank on April 09, 2021, 07:14:54 PM
Ingenuity is set to fly, Sunday, April 11th, 8pm US Pacific Time.  :clap: But probably no pics until Monday.

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/science/nasas-ingenuity-helicopter-prepares-to-attempt-first-controlled-flight-on-mars (https://www.pbs.org/newshour/science/nasas-ingenuity-helicopter-prepares-to-attempt-first-controlled-flight-on-mars)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on April 09, 2021, 09:31:41 PM
This should be good. Can't wait.  :bd:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on April 10, 2021, 02:37:10 PM
First flight delayed...no sooner than April 14

Quote
NASA's Ingenuity Mars helicopter is scheduled to lift off no sooner than April 14 in the first-ever attempt at powered, controlled flight on another planet, a delay from its initial planned launch date.

While lift-off was initially targeted for Sunday, April 11, the agency announced the delay on Saturday afternoon.

In a release, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) explained that the decision was made based on data that arrived late Friday night.

"During a high-speed spin test of the rotors on Friday, the command sequence controlling the test ended early due to a 'watchdog' timer expiration. This occurred as it was trying to transition the flight computer from ‘Pre-Flight’ to ‘Flight’ mode," they explained. "The helicopter is safe and healthy and communicated its full telemetry set to Earth."

https://www.foxnews.com/science/nasas-mars-helicopter-ingenuity-historic-flight
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on April 19, 2021, 04:24:23 AM
First Flight of the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter: Live from Mission Control   https://www.twitch.tv/nasa
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: jamus34 on April 19, 2021, 06:19:47 AM
First Flight of the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter: Live from Mission Control   https://www.twitch.tv/nasa

This is probably the coolest thing we've done on an extraterrestrial basis since landing a man on the moon.

It's one thing to land something on another planet, but to achieve powered flight in almost no atmosphere is unbelievable.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: ArizonaTank on April 19, 2021, 07:42:41 AM
First Flight of the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter: Live from Mission Control   https://www.twitch.tv/nasa

This is probably the coolest thing we've done on an extraterrestrial basis since landing a man on the moon.

It's one thing to land something on another planet, but to achieve powered flight in almost no atmosphere is unbelievable.

+1
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on April 19, 2021, 08:35:24 AM
Another plus for 2021, NASA and USA  O0

(https://a57.foxnews.com/static.foxnews.com/foxnews.com/content/uploads/2021/04/1862/1048/NASA-Mars-Ingenuity-flight-2.jpg?ve=1&tl=1)
NASA's experimental Mars helicopter Ingenuity lands on the surface of Mars on Monday. (NASA/AP)

Not sure if this shot is from todays flight, but its a great closeup shot of Ingenuity:

(https://a57.foxnews.com/static.foxnews.com/foxnews.com/content/uploads/2021/04/1862/1048/jpegPIA24547-CROP.jpg?ve=1&tl=1)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on April 19, 2021, 09:07:34 AM
 :bd: :clap:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on April 26, 2021, 03:31:44 PM
Gotta look close at the image below to see Ingenuity, but yesterday she took her 3rd flight.

(http://static.scientificamerican.com/sciam/cache/file/0648FEC3-9D21-462F-B405FDE7CE2A8789_source.jpeg?w=590&h=800&825C05F0-DAEA-4AFF-8E1E082AFB088AA8)


Quote
Make it a hat trick on the Red Planet for NASA’s Mars helicopter Ingenuity.

The 4-lb. (1.8 kilograms) chopper aced its third-ever Martian flight early this morning (April 25), adding to its already impressive resume.

“Third flight in the history books.” officials at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California wrote on Twitter. “Our #MarsHelicopter continues to set records, flying faster and farther. The space chopper is demonstrating critical capabilities that could enable the addition of an aerial dimension to future missions to Mars & beyond.”

And today’s sortie was significantly more complex than Ingenuity’s previous two flights, which took place on Monday (April 19) and Thursday (April 22), respectively. On its historic, 39-second debut hop—the first powered, controlled flight for an aircraft on a world beyond Earth—the solar-powered helicopter went straight up and down and reached a maximum altitude of about 16.5 feet (5 meters).

Ingenuity went about that high on flight number two but stayed up for nearly 52 seconds and moved side-to-side a total of 13 feet (4 m).

“For the third flight, we’re targeting the same altitude, but we are going to open things up a bit, too, increasing our max airspeed from 0.5 meters per second to 2 meters per second (about 4.5 mph) as we head 50 meters (164 feet) north and return to land at Wright Brothers Field,” Ingenuity chief pilot Håvard Grip, of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Southern California, wrote in a blog post Friday (April 23). (The Ingenuity team named the chopper’s flight zone after aviation pioneers Wilbur and Orville Wright.)

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/mars-helicopter-ingenuity-goes-long-distance-in-third-flight/
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on April 29, 2021, 12:54:30 PM
Here is a video of the 3rd flight.   O0

https://www.space.com/mars-helicopter-ingenuity-ready-for-fourth-flight

Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on April 30, 2021, 12:31:56 PM
4th flight got delayed by the same software glitch that delayed the 1st flight, but NASA says all is well with Ingenuity and the 4th (and 5th) flights will happen.  Not only that, but NASA now says Ingenuity won't be abandoned after 30 days.  The "mission will now change into an “operations demonstration”, to see how it might help do science work."   :bd:

https://news.yahoo.com/nasa-mars-helicopter-ingenuity-passes-155606645.html
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on April 30, 2021, 01:39:06 PM
Very cool!  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: solops on April 30, 2021, 02:44:10 PM
Some interesting views on the origins of humanity.

Fossils may indicate that human ancestors evolved in Europe.

https://bigthink.com/surprising-science/evolution-europe (https://bigthink.com/surprising-science/evolution-europe) 

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170523083548.htm (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170523083548.htm)



Musings on the above mentioned article and a deep dive into the possibility that humanity was genetically engineered.


This is quite an interesting idea. You have to skip to the middle of the video to get past all of the political posturing BS to get to the point about mutation and 23 vs 24 pairs of chromosomes, but once you get there there are some thought provoking points made. I suspect some further due diligence in necessary on the part of the reader/viewer.

Edit a few minutes later -  it did not take long to find a rebuttal, which is hilarious in places.

https://www.discovermagazine.com/the-sciences/the-mystery-of-the-missing-chromosome-with-a-special-guest-appearance-from-facebook-creationists

The rebuttal has some flaws in it as well. It does not address some of the more interesting points of the video and its characterization of  the the group  suggesting genetic engineering as "creationists" does not make sense to me, unless there is a third interpretation out there claiming the Finger of God is at play in genetic engineering. The key seems to be whether an individual with the 23 chromosome mutation can successfully mate with a 24 chromosome individual and produce viable offspring that carry the trait (way back then). No one seems to investigate that point very well, beyond saying "it can't happen because we cannot breed with apes". Obviously, either successful breeding did occur, or someone played with the genes of a large enough group of proto-hominids to create a viable breeding pool.

Or we are the descendants of a race from another world, unrelated to earth hominids.

Or the result of early hominid magic!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on May 03, 2021, 01:55:25 PM
Modern homo sapiens used to bang with Neanderthals quite frequently.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Gusington on May 03, 2021, 02:14:44 PM
^Do you have some dirty cave scrawlings you created that you want to share with us?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: GDS_Starfury on May 03, 2021, 06:16:04 PM
he was there.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Gusington on May 03, 2021, 06:28:37 PM
Was he the Neanderthal or the 'modern homosapein'?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: al_infierno on May 03, 2021, 07:42:14 PM
It's pretty telling that just about all the highly upvoted comments on that "genetic engineering" YouTube video are people shouting about how enlightened they are for knowing the truth and some totally not coded racist remarks about how diversity is bad and it's OK to only want to hang out with people that "look like you."   :2funny:  ::)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on May 10, 2021, 02:35:51 PM
Asteroid sample on way back to Earth (https://www.foxnews.com/science/nasa-osiris-rex-spacecraft-earth-asteroid-sample) in 2023.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on May 10, 2021, 05:39:47 PM
Very cool!  :clap:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on July 11, 2021, 06:21:50 AM


Virgin Galactic (VSS Unity SpaceShipTwo) will launch into space today.  Here (YT) you can watch it live.

Should start in about 2 hours.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on July 11, 2021, 11:07:58 AM
Sounds like he had a great trip. 
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on December 16, 2021, 03:19:13 PM
Didn't happen this week, but still cool hot.  NASA space probe makes history by ‘touching’ the outermost layer of the Sun (https://www.studyfinds.org/nasa-probe-touching-the-sun/).
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on February 11, 2022, 12:24:58 PM
https://www.space.com/james-webb-space-telescope-first-photos-unveiled

(https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/aCMKHMrCpXxbrqY9ogLxUL-970-80.png)

The first published image taken by the James Webb Space Telescope shows part of a mosaic created over 25 hours beginning on Feb. 2, 2022, early in the process of aligning the 18 segments of the James Webb Space Telescope's mirror.

(https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/2E773DhoYF4mPuMpKHCRo4-970-80.png)

A "selfie" shows the 18 segments of the James Webb Space Telescope's primary mirror as seen from a specialized camera inside the NIRCam instrument.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on February 11, 2022, 12:41:13 PM
Nice!  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on February 20, 2022, 01:59:41 PM
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fncir.2022.815838/full  - Brain Connectometry Changes in Space Travelers After Long-Duration Spaceflight.

Physiological changes from being in space reverse themselves once an astronaut is back on Earth, others can be offset through diet, exercise, and other actions.
But when it comes to the brain, changes may be more permanent for space travelers, as found by the new peer-reviewed study published Friday in Frontiers of Neural Circuits.

After spaceflight, Wuyts and his team identified tiny “microstructural” changes that occurred not only in the sensorimotor tracts of the brain but also in regions like the cerebellum, which plays a big role in movement and mediating social behavior.
Changes were also seen in white matter tracts connecting the corpus callosum (the communication bridge between our left and right brain hemispheres) and regions involved in language processing and executive function.
On the final MRIs taken seven months later, some microstructural changes reverted to pre-flight conditions—but not all of them. It’s one of the first major pieces of evidence to demonstrate that space can permanently alter the human brain.
Wuyts’ team thinks the space environment (and its microgravity conditions) causes fluid cavities in the brain to dilate, pushing adjacent neural tissue around.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sigwolf on February 20, 2022, 07:17:35 PM
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fncir.2022.815838/full  - Brain Connectometry Changes in Space Travelers After Long-Duration Spaceflight.

Physiological changes from being in space reverse themselves once an astronaut is back on Earth, others can be offset through diet, exercise, and other actions.
But when it comes to the brain, changes may be more permanent for space travelers, as found by the new peer-reviewed study published Friday in Frontiers of Neural Circuits.

After spaceflight, Wuyts and his team identified tiny “microstructural” changes that occurred not only in the sensorimotor tracts of the brain but also in regions like the cerebellum, which plays a big role in movement and mediating social behavior.
Changes were also seen in white matter tracts connecting the corpus callosum (the communication bridge between our left and right brain hemispheres) and regions involved in language processing and executive function.
On the final MRIs taken seven months later, some microstructural changes reverted to pre-flight conditions—but not all of them. It’s one of the first major pieces of evidence to demonstrate that space can permanently alter the human brain.
Wuyts’ team thinks the space environment (and its microgravity conditions) causes fluid cavities in the brain to dilate, pushing adjacent neural tissue around.
Holy crap, that is amazing, and intimidating.  Space travel and colonization seems like such a natural progression for the future, but there is so much still unknown.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on March 30, 2022, 05:25:47 PM
Hubble Spots Farthest Star Ever Seen (https://hubblesite.org/contents/news-releases/2022/news-2022-003)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on March 30, 2022, 08:50:50 PM
That IS cool.  :o
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on April 26, 2022, 09:27:04 AM
Perseverance rover captures the best video of a Martian solar eclipse ever (https://www.accuweather.com/en/space-news/nasa-rover-captures-the-best-ever-video-of-martian-solar-eclipse/1177894)


Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on April 26, 2022, 12:28:26 PM
That's pretty cool, a 40 sec. eclipse.  O0
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on April 28, 2022, 01:01:13 PM
Mars Ingenuity helicopter spots wreckage of Perseverance rover's landing equipment (https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-10762267/Ingenuity-helicopter-spots-wreckage-Perseverance-rovers-landing-equipment.html)

(http://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2022/04/28/09/57148813-10762267-Fascinating_Otherworldly_images_that_capture_what_looks_like_a_f-a-23_1651135500578.jpg)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on May 11, 2022, 10:08:54 AM
https://redstate.com/alexparker/2022/05/11/move-over-iron-man-real-jet-suited-heroes-may-soon-respond-to-our-emergencies-n562812



Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Gusington on May 11, 2022, 10:46:22 AM
^Hahaha holy crap
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on May 11, 2022, 02:10:01 PM
That's great. Now how do we get him down?  ???
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Gusington on May 11, 2022, 02:12:06 PM
'Carefully.'
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sigwolf on May 12, 2022, 08:39:23 AM
That's great. Now how do we get him down?  ???
Perhaps two jet-suited men could fly an injured person back down, suspended on a rope between them?  That is how swallows used to get coconuts to England, after all.   :D
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on May 12, 2022, 02:35:13 PM
England has coconuts?!   :o  How'd I miss that? Next thing you'll be telling me is they have American Football.  ???
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on May 31, 2022, 02:15:25 PM
Uranus is green...and Neptune is blue (https://uk.news.yahoo.com/scientists-finally-explain-why-uranus-140000559.html)  :-"

(https://offthepress.com/app/uploads/2022/05/planets.jpg)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on June 06, 2022, 08:59:10 PM
That's what, 'They', want us to think.  :o
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on August 28, 2022, 07:12:52 PM
Artemis I (https://www.nasa.gov/artemis-1) is scheduled for liftoff on August 29th at approximately 8:33am ET.  This is a test of the Space Launch System (SLS) (https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/index.html) that will send an Orion capsule (https://www.nasa.gov/feature/meet-nasa-s-orion-spacecraft) with 3 test dummies into Lunar orbit and back to Earth. 

(http://offthepress.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/GettyImages-1418835769.jpg.webp)

Artemis 1 will last for three weeks and will test all the rocket stages and spacecraft that would be used in later Artemis missions. After reaching orbit and performing a trans-lunar injection (burn to the Moon), the mission will deploy ten CubeSat satellites and the Orion spacecraft will enter a distant retrograde orbit for six days. The Orion spacecraft will then return and reenter the Earth's atmosphere, protected by its heat shield, and splash down in the Pacific Ocean. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artemis_1)

USA is heading back to the Moon.  \m/

For those with Oculus Quest VR sets,
Quote
"Artemis Ascending" will use 360-degree virtual reality to let participants feel like they're standing near the Artemis 1 mission as it lifts off no earlier than Monday (Aug. 29). You'll be able to virtually witness NASA's most powerful rocket yet, the Space Launch System (SLS) megarocket, as it lifts the Orion spacecraft on a journey to the moon. Liftoff is set for 8:33 a.m. EDT (1233 GMT).

https://www.space.com/artemis-1-virtual-reality-watch-live

https://www.space.com/artemis-1-moon-wild-facts-mission
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on August 28, 2022, 09:49:00 PM
Another American Milestone, the first country to send dummies to the moon.  :bd:  Suck on that Chi Comms!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on August 29, 2022, 07:09:53 AM
Liftoff scrubbed until at least Friday.   :(

https://www.foxbusiness.com/technology/nasas-artemis-one-mission-moon-rocket-launch-scrubbed-delays
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Gusington on August 29, 2022, 07:20:08 AM
Is this next launch in prep for some kind of permanent human presence on the Moon?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on August 29, 2022, 07:21:07 AM
NASA calls off Artemis 1 moon rocket launch over engine cooling issue.

Chilling the SLS rocket's engines before flowing cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen through them is a required step before the rocket can launch, NASA officials said. While three of the engines passed that test, Engine No. 3 did not, despite troubleshooting efforts.
"Launch controllers condition the engines by increasing pressure on the core stage tanks to bleed some of the cryogenic propellant to the engines to get them to the proper temperature range to start them," NASA officials said in a statement.
"Engine 3 is not properly being conditioned through the bleed process, and engineers are troubleshooting."

All four of these engines flew on NASA's space shuttle program of reusable vehicles. 

https://www.space.com/artemis-1-space-shuttle-hardware :

NASA's Artemis 1 mission to launch using space shuttle-used parts.  Components that previously flew on 83 out of the 135 space shuttle missions have been assembled into new vehicles: the Space Launch System (SLS) and its Orion spacecraft.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on August 31, 2022, 03:45:53 PM
Quote
NASA will target Saturday, Sept. 3 at 2:17 p.m. EDT, the beginning of a two-hour window, for the launch of Artemis I, the first integrated test of NASA’s Orion spacecraft, Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, and the ground systems at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/artemis/2022/08/30/nasa-targets-sept-3-for-next-artemis-i-moon-mission-launch-attempt/
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: GDS_Starfury on August 31, 2022, 07:52:49 PM
on one hand awesome and on the other did it have to cost $40 billion.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on September 03, 2022, 06:44:52 AM
More leaks in Artemis while fueling.

https://www.foxbusiness.com/technology/artemis-launch-nasa-rocket-leaks-liquid-hydrogen-fuel-second-attempt
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on September 03, 2022, 01:50:34 PM
Liftoff scrubbed again...maybe until October.

https://www.foxnews.com/science/nasa-weighing-moving-artemis-rocket-off-launch-pad-second-scrub
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on September 04, 2022, 03:16:52 AM
Liftoff scrubbed again...maybe until October.

https://www.foxnews.com/science/nasa-weighing-moving-artemis-rocket-off-launch-pad-second-scrub

They use decades old technology from the Space Shuttle and now they have the same problems as the Space Shuttle.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Millipede on September 04, 2022, 08:50:33 AM
I'm trying to recall which Shuttle launch was delayed by a fuel leak... enlighten me please.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on September 04, 2022, 10:20:53 AM
Discovery's launch in 2010 was delayed twice due to a leak, one of fuel and one of gasses used to pressurize the lines.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on September 04, 2022, 10:39:09 AM
I'm trying to recall which Shuttle launch was delayed by a fuel leak... enlighten me please.

1986 : https://www.history.com/news/how-the-challenger-disaster-changed-nasa (Challenger - leak in the booster - O-ring)

2009 : https://www.space.com/6837-gas-leak-thwarts-space-shuttle-launch.html (Endeavour- hydrogen leak was discovered while the shuttle's fuel tank was loading)

2010 October : https://www.nbcnews.com/id/wbna39768658 (Discovery - replacing fuel line seals to staunch a small leak)
2010 November : https://www.space.com/93-nasa-tracks-space-shuttle-discovery-gas-leak-faulty-seal.html (Discovery - misaligned seal on the external fuel tank - potentially dangerous leak of hydrogen gas)

Challenger should have been delayed.  If exposed to near-freezing temperatures, the O-ring lost its elasticity.  The O-ring could only work properly above 53 degrees and the temperature on the launch pad that morning was 36 degrees.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Millipede on September 04, 2022, 01:43:53 PM
Good catch on the Discovery & Endeavor leaks although 2 out of 135 launches ain't too bad. On the Challenger O-ring failure, that would have absolutely nothing to do with a fuel leak. I thought this was about the Artemis fuel leak but if you wish to talk about failures and/or successes of the shuttle program, okay. Was the shuttle perfect? Of course not, let's not be silly. Was it the economically reusable vehicle it was supposed to be? While it was reusable, it was an economic disaster. Was it an amazing machine that supremely challenged human creativity? Absolutely! Without the shuttle, there would be no Hubble or ISS to name just 2 of it's successes.

I could certainly have misunderstood but I think I detect a subtle criticism of NASA. In general, I don't understand why so many feel the need to do that. I believe that it is largely overlooked that NASA is a government agency and while they can make requests and lobby for various projects it only gets to proceed with the permission and funding from congress. Congressional decisions also frequently dictate how and where a project may proceed.  If you had to make a life changing decision, would you prefer to base that decision on choices by the U.S. Congress or NASA? If NASA didn't exist, would JAXA, CSA, ESA, Blue Origin or SpaceX exist?

To get back to Artemis and the SLS, right or wrong, it's the path NASA is on and it will have it's successes, failures and delays.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on September 05, 2022, 01:51:29 AM
I could certainly have misunderstood but I think I detect a subtle criticism of NASA.

It's more of a criticism of the people who decided it would be better/cheaper for NASA to reuse old technology.


https://www.space.com/artemis-1-space-shuttle-hardware

As directed by Congress in 2010, NASA developed its next-generation heavy-lift rocket and crew capsule with "space shuttle-derived components ... that use existing United States propulsion systems, including liquid fuel engines, external tank or tank-related capability and solid rocket motor engines."
The result is an SLS powered by four modified space shuttle main engines and two extended shuttle solid rocket boosters. Orion is also powered using an engine that previously maneuvered the shuttle in orbit. All three elements of the Artemis 1 SLS and Orion have flight histories that date back decades, as far back as August 1984.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Millipede on September 05, 2022, 08:59:57 AM
I agree with your criticism... sort of. I don't know how accurate this is (strangely I wasn't included in the discussions) but I wonder if using shuttle tech/hardware wasn't the most likely way to get approval from congress. Remember that the decision to end the shuttle program was made in 2004 at which point NASA started the process of deciding on a post-shuttle direction. That was years prior to SpaceX's first successful Falcon launch and yet NASA eventually decided to rely on commercial space to take care of low earth orbit while it concentrated on the moon, Mars and beyond. Reusable launch vehicles were yet to be a reliable option so they went with tech that was known to present to congress.

I don't have a problem with shuttle tech. As is well known, you learn from your failures thus shuttle launch components are reliable (certainly more so than brand new tech) and relatively inexpensive. Can you imagine how far away we would be from 1st launch and how much money would have been spent if the decision had been made to start with a clean sheet of paper and fresh technology for the next launch vehicle?

I too have reservations about the SLS. I just cringe at the thought of destroying each vehicle after each launch but saying, "oops, this isn't a good plan. Let's start over." is even more cringe worthy.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on September 12, 2022, 10:26:14 AM
I'm trying to recall which Shuttle launch was delayed by a fuel leak... enlighten me please.

slight variation of Cunningham's Law  :clap:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on September 21, 2022, 04:01:23 PM
OK, so this event is actually next week, but still...

DART, for Double Asteroid Redirection Test (https://arstechnica.com/science/2022/09/nasas-dart-asteroid-redirection-test-set-for-monday/)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on September 23, 2022, 09:50:21 AM
Interplanetary Pool.  :bd:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on September 26, 2022, 09:21:38 AM
DART mission website:  https://dart.jhuapl.edu/Mission/index.php

Impact at 7:14pm EDT tonight
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on September 26, 2022, 09:43:58 AM
Fingers crossed.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: ArizonaTank on September 26, 2022, 10:22:20 AM
DART mission website:  https://dart.jhuapl.edu/Mission/index.php

Impact at 7:14pm EDT tonight

Looking forward to this.

This one relatively obscure NASA mission may prove the technology that will save the whole damn world someday.

Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on September 26, 2022, 09:28:34 PM
Bullseye!

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/dart-s-final-images-prior-to-impact
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on September 27, 2022, 06:57:27 AM
View of impact from an earth-bound telescope.  Clearer views should be forth coming from the LICIACube, Hubble and JWST.

https://twitter.com/fallingstarIfA/status/1574583529731670021

https://twitter.com/astrosnapper/status/1574578176214196225
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on September 27, 2022, 09:58:01 AM
Bullseye!

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/dart-s-final-images-prior-to-impact

Now we wait to see if it was enough to impart a strong course change.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on September 30, 2022, 12:30:03 PM
https://www.space.com/nasa-spacex-possible-dragon-mission-hubble-space-telescope

SpaceX and NASA might team up to save the Hubble Space Telescope.

A new service mission to lift the aging telescope, repair failing parts, and upgrade old ones could add 20 years to its lifespan.

The idea would be to send SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spacecraft to the Hubble in order to boost it from its current 332 mile altitude orbit, to the 372 mile altitude it was originally stationed at when it was launched 1990.
The study will look at the economic feasibility of such a mission, and explore whether or not the two parties could conduct a service mission to upgrade and repair the Hubble as well.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on September 30, 2022, 02:54:51 PM
https://www.space.com/nasa-spacex-possible-dragon-mission-hubble-space-telescope

SpaceX and NASA might team up to save the Hubble Space Telescope.

A new service mission to lift the aging telescope, repair failing parts, and upgrade old ones could add 20 years to its lifespan.

The idea would be to send SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spacecraft to the Hubble in order to boost it from its current 332 mile altitude orbit, to the 372 mile altitude it was originally stationed at when it was launched 1990.
The study will look at the economic feasibility of such a mission, and explore whether or not the two parties could conduct a service mission to upgrade and repair the Hubble as well.

That would be great!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: GDS_Starfury on September 30, 2022, 04:51:17 PM
it aint like the Hubble cant perform anymore!

(https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/2209/FairyPillar_Hubble_3857.jpg)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on September 30, 2022, 05:55:50 PM
it aint like the Hubble cant perform anymore!

(https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/2209/FairyPillar_Hubble_3857.jpg)

+1

All the more reason to try to keep it around a bit lot longer...
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on October 04, 2022, 03:08:41 PM
So NASA made a bit of a mess...Smacked asteroid’s debris trail more than 6,000 miles long (https://apnews.com/article/astronomy-science-asteroids-matthew-knight-6d62c444d53af7d542b222a19623adba)

(http://storage.googleapis.com/afs-prod/media/31356cfd8c424adbaa1eb0b20c4df906/1000.jpeg)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on October 05, 2022, 09:43:01 AM
So they turned an asteroid into a comet. At least it's prettier now.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on October 05, 2022, 09:44:41 AM
NASA's SpaceX Crew-5 Launch to the International Space Station

https://www.twitch.tv/nasa

Launch in about 15 min.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: ArizonaTank on October 06, 2022, 09:36:45 AM
I think this belongs in science....

Anyway, some folks in the UK have built a machine that uses AI and low wattage lasers to hunt cockroaches.

The article says: "The rationale is that pesticides are bad for the environment – at least, that was the excuse they gave in the abstract."

But something in the back of my brain is screaming that this is how "Terminators" get started.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/boffins-hunt-and-kill-cockroaches-with-machine-vision-laser/ar-AA12DNvW?ocid=msedgntp&cvid=7c9ab446e5f04693ab68ad3bf327f91c (https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/boffins-hunt-and-kill-cockroaches-with-machine-vision-laser/ar-AA12DNvW?ocid=msedgntp&cvid=7c9ab446e5f04693ab68ad3bf327f91c)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on October 06, 2022, 10:29:18 AM
Roach-inator?  ???  Won't the roaches just build something bigger?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: FarAway Sooner on October 06, 2022, 10:31:05 AM
The question of whether humanity should be viewed by other artificial life in the same way that we view cockroaches--and who gets to decide that question--has been a recurring theme in science fiction.

If they ever take that aiming technology and hand it to the Imperial stormtroopers, the New Republic better look out!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: GDS_Starfury on October 06, 2022, 04:03:32 PM
there's a Love Death & Robots episode about this.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: ArizonaTank on October 07, 2022, 09:28:45 AM
Somebody heard us... 'Robot makers pledge not to weaponize' 

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/robot-makers-including-boston-dynamics-pledge-not-to-weaponize-their-creations/ar-AA12Hn5m?ocid=msedgntp&cvid=205dbdc091484009bcefdfaf686c5317 (https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/robot-makers-including-boston-dynamics-pledge-not-to-weaponize-their-creations/ar-AA12Hn5m?ocid=msedgntp&cvid=205dbdc091484009bcefdfaf686c5317)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sigwolf on October 08, 2022, 08:48:15 AM
Well, that should certainly take care of anyone's concerns...

"But they pledged!"     :DD
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on October 08, 2022, 08:57:11 AM
A few 3rd party mods and add-on parts and you got

(http://64.media.tumblr.com/a45cfd5b3aaea67a821e73fa9f0fdf8a/tumblr_ogh49vcQTi1uqrdeoo1_500.gif)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on October 11, 2022, 01:17:16 PM
A few 3rd party mods and add-on parts and you got

(http://64.media.tumblr.com/a45cfd5b3aaea67a821e73fa9f0fdf8a/tumblr_ogh49vcQTi1uqrdeoo1_500.gif)

but it will look like this...
(https://img.women.com/images/images/000/007/593/large/Wall-e.jpg.jpg?1452569079)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Gusington on October 11, 2022, 01:59:51 PM
^That's the Russian version.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: GDS_Starfury on October 11, 2022, 03:10:26 PM
hey!  dont pick on Wall-E!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: steve58 on October 11, 2022, 03:46:27 PM
Bullseye!

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/dart-s-final-images-prior-to-impact

Quote
The moonlet asteroid previously took nearly 12 hours to orbit the larger Didymos. Now, based on ground-based telescope observations, Dimorphos orbits the asteroid in 11 hours and 23 minutes, a change of about 4%.

NASA’s first planetary defense test changes asteroid’s orbit by 32 minutes (https://www.foxweather.com/earth-space/nasa-calls-first-planetary-defense-test-a-success)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on October 11, 2022, 09:12:59 PM
I think we're going to need a bigger boat.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Windigo on October 12, 2022, 03:02:33 PM
Somewhere the personified butterfly effect just woke up and thought, "Wut dis?"
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: ArizonaTank on October 12, 2022, 06:47:09 PM
Bullseye!

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/dart-s-final-images-prior-to-impact

Quote
The moonlet asteroid previously took nearly 12 hours to orbit the larger Didymos. Now, based on ground-based telescope observations, Dimorphos orbits the asteroid in 11 hours and 23 minutes, a change of about 4%.

NASA’s first planetary defense test changes asteroid’s orbit by 32 minutes (https://www.foxweather.com/earth-space/nasa-calls-first-planetary-defense-test-a-success)

This is great news!!!  Humanity has a chance!
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: GDS_Starfury on October 12, 2022, 09:44:10 PM
no we dont.  <:-)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on October 13, 2022, 08:33:12 PM
Yeah, Near Earth Asteroids are the least of our worries right now.
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Sir Slash on October 13, 2022, 08:52:15 PM
Exactly. Killer Hornet-nados would be my first pick.  :hide:
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: GDS_Starfury on October 28, 2022, 08:41:57 PM
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/FgKX_fkWAAIQ4MV?format=jpg&name=large)
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Staggerwing on October 30, 2022, 08:57:07 AM
One of the chaos lords entering our realm?
Title: Re: What's Cool in Science This Week?
Post by: Pete Dero on October 30, 2022, 09:33:08 AM
(https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/styles/full_width_feature/public/thumbnails/image/stsci-01gfnn3pwjmy4rqxkz585bc4qh.png) (https://pbs.twimg.com/media/FgKX_fkWAAIQ4MV?format=jpg&name=large) (https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/thumbnails/image/pillars_of_creation.jpg)

The left is an image from JWST's Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) while the middle one is from Webb's Mid-Infrared Instrument.   The right one is from Hubble and resembles most how it would look to the human eye.


The Eagle Nebula shown on the pictures is some 6,500–7,000 light-years from Earth.  If you could travel at the speed of light it would take over 2 years to travel through the shown area .