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Bison:

--- Quote from: Nefaro on January 16, 2017, 10:42:12 PM ---
--- Quote from: bayonetbrant on January 16, 2017, 04:49:22 PM ---King Arthur Pendragon 1st ed is free thru January

http://www.drivethrurpg.com/product/3125/King-Arthur-Pendragon-1st-Edition

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--- Quote from: Bison on January 16, 2017, 04:59:30 PM ---Awesome.  I always wanted to read the rules for this.

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Pendragon is a good classic with an interesting system. 


Don't think I've ever read the 1st Edition.  Started with 2nd IIRC, but I'm pretty sure the core system is the same throughout.  More options & fluff in later ones I suppose.

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I need to read again, but so far I'm not sure how impressed I am with the system. 

Nefaro:

--- Quote from: Bison on January 17, 2017, 04:47:02 PM ---
--- Quote from: Nefaro on January 16, 2017, 10:42:12 PM ---


Pendragon is a good classic with an interesting system. 


Don't think I've ever read the 1st Edition.  Started with 2nd IIRC, but I'm pretty sure the core system is the same throughout.  More options & fluff in later ones I suppose.

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I need to read again, but so far I'm not sure how impressed I am with the system.

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The mechanics are very simple.  I'd liken them to a very simple version of Runequest, but using a d20 roll instead of d100 and with much fewer combat maneuver options.  Probably even more simple in 1st Edition, but I haven't yet compared to later stuff.  There is likely a lot more content in my 3rd (or 4th?) edition than the original, but I think I've read others mention that the core mechanics are mostly the same. 



One of the things that set Pendragon apart from other RPGs, aside from being dedicated to playing knights based on Thomas Malory's version of mythical Arthurian Britain, was the long-term campaign.  Not only did it have separate undertakings based on season, namely Wintering, but it also featured generational play.  In other words, if your character died you could continue onward by rolling up one of their children and passing along some traits/bonuses from father to son.  Character aging, and it's effects on stats, virtues/flaws, etc is in slow and somewhat random flux over the years and is more important than many RPGs due to this generational thing.

Of course, the hereditary stuff wasn't the only feudal nobility things to be involved with (and aside from adventuring/questing).  When you made the first character of a new family, you'd also roll up their status, holdings, liege, number of familial knights and soldiers you could call to battle, etc.  So in addition to appropriate questing of the regular adventure types we're all familiar with in RPGs, it also promoted dynastic roleplay.  Like a tabletop RPG with the mechanical seeds for CK-like dynastic struggles & intrigue the GM and players may have wanted to dip into.




Another thing that set it apart back then was it's character Virtue/Vice system.  There is a list of polar opposite Virtues & Vices, paired sets.  ex. Brave->Cowardly, Contemplative->Boisterous, Modest->Braggart; I don't recall specifics but things of that nature.  If one side is rated '14' then the other is '6'. 

They're listed and valued much like the skills are (1-20+).  They're rolled/chosen during character creation and can change over the course of play, depending on how they're un/successfully used.  They're also tested like skills and can be invoked for extra bonuses, rewards, or whatever the GM wants to use them for.  You can also become a paragon of your selected faith, gaining permanent bonuses while the specific virtues & vices of that religion are kept at certain minimums.  Christian and Pagan knights have different favored ones.

Therefore the Virtue & Vice system can be used as mechanical motivation to try & be that ideal Christian or Pagan exemplar, making hard choices between making an convenient decision to take the 'easy route' or upholding your proclaimed virtuous ideals.  Or just see how those things turn out via your in-character decisions over time.  The GM can, and should, also use it to test characters, and to create tough decisions via situations that can affect them.



I've since seen some later RPGs utilize some of these ideas.  More recently I've seen the Star Wars Force & Destiny rpg has a simpler, more loose interpretation of the Virtue-Vice system.  Quite a few have had some kind of mechanics regarding personality traits & such over the years and I don't recall any of them doing so before Pendragon.  The One Ring rpg has some seasonal mechanics, and most notably the Winter Phase.  It has obviously inspired some of those people currently creating RPGs.    8)

Bison:
Swords and Wizardry Complete Rulebook is free http://www.drivethrurpg.com/product/86546/Swords-and-Wizardry-Complete-Rule-Book

Nefaro:

--- Quote from: Bison on January 21, 2017, 02:34:41 PM ---Swords and Wizardry Complete Rulebook is free http://www.drivethrurpg.com/product/86546/Swords-and-Wizardry-Complete-Rule-Book

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Also noticed WEG's D6 "core set" bundle is free.  Guessing that's a regular thing.

bayonetbrant:
Yep. The d6 series is usually a free PDF these days.

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